glance

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glance

1
Cricket a stroke in which the ball is deflected off the bat to the leg side; glide

glance

2
Mineralogy any mineral having a metallic lustre, esp a simple sulphide
References in periodicals archive ?
Roberts's reading of his at times overtly masculine, picket-line work does glancingly address the "unexamined misogyny that would peak in his writings following the election of Thatcher," a tendency partially redeemed by his late poetry, especially Pearl, which "shows his capacity for portraying and imagining a female voice and life." Roberts's focus, though, is on MacSweeney's first book, The Boy from the Green Cabaret Tells of His Mother, published by Hutchinson in 1968.
Eade's book is subtitled, with some precision, A Life Revisited, for it is Evelyn Waugh's life and only glancingly his work to which Eade devotes his attention.
Daborne--he says--was "narrowly pursued by the Officers of Iustice" and "made a cunning escape," the outcome being that by transferring to Ireland he put "the Ocean betwixt him and his Creditors." Comerford glancingly supplies further information.
McDonough spends more time recounting Sherman's social life during this frontier period than he does describing any of the encounters Sherman had with the quarter-million hostile inhabitants of the vast territory he now oversaw, but readers are told enough to sympathize with the general: "As soon as he struck the Indians in one place, they would ride for another, usually and wisely refusing to fight except when they could set up an ambush or in some manner gain an advantage" McDonough mentions only glancingly the form those "strikes" usually took, although readers coming fresh from the burning schoolhouses and raped housewives of the Georgia campaign won't be surprised to learn about attacks on peaceful winter villages of women and children and elderly.
But the affinities between actor and character invest a personal touch to an otherwise campy, Alice-in-Blaxploitationland fantasy that's glancingly concerned with self-empowerment.
Hidden, but not wholly lost: as I've been suggesting, once a narrator mentions something in a story, it cannot completely be un-mentioned, so when the novel finally does get to Randalls, a reader's sense of that space will be conditioned (however glancingly) by prior knowledge of an invisible inhabitant, as Austen populates the house with the ghostly presence of servants decades before Henry James gave us The Turn of the Screw.
(120.) Barton, supra note 34, at 1173-74 ("The few commentators who have addressed this question have approached it as a matter of doctrine, i.e., whether the "inherent authority" claimed by state supreme courts is a proper reading of state constitutional law, or have treated the topic glancingly.").
Shi'ism (meaning Twelver Shi'ism--Freidenreich omits other forms, discussing only Zaydis glancingly) is much more restrictive.
Rather than defining modernism--a vast field of scholarly research with which Nicolay seems, at best, only glancingly familiar--Nicolay makes wild assumptions about "the" modernists that are hardly credible, all the less so with the paucity of secondary sources or citation of authority.
Think of the dozens of Gerald Stern poems invoking pogroms and the holocaust, often glancingly, on the understanding that pogroms and the holocaust are simply part of the ordinary air one breathes, but sometimes sneakily, as in that masterpiece of memory "The Dancing," where the murder of Jews is never explicitly mentioned.
In explaining these trends, Murray only glancingly mentions the economy and omits a sustained analysis of labor market developments (pp.
Gritsch, a Lutheran and a respected scholar of Luther who teaches in a Lutheran seminary (I recognize the clanging sound of the repetition of this identification, but it is of consequence because of the severity of the judgment the book ultimately makes about the founder of that denomination) forthrightly discusses a topic that was only glancingly acknowledged or delicately alluded to in an earlier generation of Lutheran-Jewish conversations.