Glare

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glare

[gler]
(communications)
The interference that arises when an attempt is made to place a telephone call just as an incoming call is arriving; in the case of data transmission under the control of a computer, this can render the line or even the computer temporarily inoperative.
(optics)
Discomfort produced in an observer by one or more visible sources of light. Also known as discomfort glare.
Visual disability caused by visible sources or areas of luminance which are in an observer's field of view but do not assist in viewing. Also known as disability glare.
Dazzling brightness of the atmosphere, caused by excessive reflection and scattering of light by particles in the line of sight.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Glare

A state that reduces the ability to perceive the visual information needed for a particular activity. It arises when some parts of the visual field are much brighter than their surroundings.

blinding glare

So intense that for an appreciable length of time after it has been removed, no visual perception is possible.

discomfort glare

Glare that is distracting or uncomfortable, interfering with the perception of visual information required to satisfy biological needs, it does not significantly reduce the ability to see information needed for activities.

direct glare

Results from high luminances directly visible from a viewer’s position.

disability glare

Reduces the ability to perceive the visual information needed for a particular activity.

reflected glare

The reflection of incident light that partially or totally obscures the surface details by reducing the contrast on a surface.
Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture Copyright © 2012, 2002, 1998 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved

glare

The sensation produced by brightnesses within the visual field that are sufficiently greater than the luminance to which the eyes are adapted to cause annoyance, discomfort, or loss in visual performance and visibility.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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