glass transition temperature


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glass transition temperature

[¦glas ‚tran′zish·ən ‚tem·prə·chər]
(physical chemistry)
The temperature at which a liquid changes to an amorphous or glassy solid.
References in periodicals archive ?
The calculation of the Smith aging rate can be used to compare the rate of aging at temperatures well below the glass transition temperatures.
Figure 5 shows that the glass transition temperature of pure epoxy resin corresponding to the loss factor peak value is 140[degrees]C and loss factor is 0.65.
Glass Transition Temperature. Glass transition temperature, [T.sub.g], plays a vital role in understanding the physical properties of glass [21].
The range of temperature over which the solid polyurethane polymer transforms from a rigid glassy state to flexible rubbery state is known as the glass transition temperature which can be evaluated through DSC.
* High glass transition temperatures combined with low smoke and fire spread ratings.
--E 1356, "Assignment of Glass Transition Temperatures by DSC,"
Diffusivity in a polymer is determined primarily by the flexibility of the polymer chains, reflected in the glass transition temperature. PDMDPS possessed the lowest glass transition temperature and the highest diffusivity for phenol.
According to GE, the material's amorphous nature gives it good dimensional stability, creep resistance, and strength at elevated temperatures (although these properties fall off sharply as it nears its 311[degrees]C glass transition temperature, where it turns soft and rubbery).
Fitting the data to a theory which assumed that particles deform due to the action of the polymer-air surface tension, the glass transition temperature, [T.sub.g], of the latex was predicted.
Polycarbonate's properties of optical-quality transparency, high glass transition temperature, and exceptional impact strength at room temperature and below, make it a desirable engineering material, and it has been used in optical recording media, sporting equipment, unbreakable glazing materials, and automotive exteriors and interiors.
One of those fallacies is that new material types will not be needed, but more applications will switch to higher glass transition temperatures. As outlined by Kelley, glass transition temperature has been viewed as a proxy for thermal reliability, with the general view as "the higher, the better." As board layer counts have increased, with the need for thermal reliability increasing as well, many manufacturers are specifying minimum glass transition temperatures.
Part II Measuring shelf-life and spoilage: Ways of measuring shelf-life and spoilage; Verification and validation of food spoilage models; Measuring and modelling the glass transition temperature; Detecting spoilage yeasts; Measuring lipid oxidation; Accelerated shelf-life tests; Shelf-life testing; Lipid oxidation and the shelf-life of muscle foods; Index.