autostereoscopy

(redirected from glasses-free 3D)

autostereoscopy

Displaying stereo 3D images without requiring the viewer to wear glasses. Also called "auto 3D" or "glasses-free 3D." Although the Nintendo 3DS game console has been very successful, the distance from the screen to the user is short, and the viewing angle is narrow (see parallax 3D). When creating autostereoscopic TVs with large screens, the wider viewing angle presents many challenges. One solution is to provide numerous viewing angles per frame of video. Stream TV Networks provides glasses-free 3D for TV (see Ultra-D). See lenticular 3D, parallax 3D and 3D visualization.
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Companies have started developing glasses-free 3D displays by using a range of various technologies.
"Regarding tablets, we have partnered with two national-level educational institutions for promoting glasses-free 3D based visual education modules.
Home3D will be able to support more than six different viewing angles, making it possible foraround eight people to view glasses-free 3D movies, according to (http://mashable.com/2017/07/12/researchers-build-glasses-free-3d-tv-tech/#k7N9Pk1NTPqV) Mashable .
RealD is also putting "a lot of investment" into glasses-free 3D television, says Lewis, who hopes to bring it to market in the long term.
He gave examples of these new applications, such as glasses-free 3D displays and automotive applications, while mentioning that to meet the projected demand Bayer has now established a Bayfol production facility at Chempark in Leverkusen, Germany.
At CES (Consumer Electronics Show) 2011, LG, Toshiba and Sony unveiled glasses-free 3D TV prototypes for the first time and later from Samsung at this year's CES.
Stereo Processing Suite Pro, in combination with 2D to 3D Suite, also enables conversion for glasses-free 3D displays, allowing users to render the same material both for stereo 3D and autostereo 3D.
There is only one small screen device that has been able to pull of glasses-free 3D well and that is the Nintendo 3DS, and that clearly isn't a smartphone.
Like the 2012 NAB show before it, IBC was equally remarkable with the virtual disappearance of 3D products from the show, save the focus on glasses-free 3D displays, of which there were several.