glassy alloy

glassy alloy

[¦glas·ē ′al‚ȯi]
(metallurgy)
An alloy having an amorphous or glassy structure. Also known as metallic glass.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Yavari, "Cobalt-based bulk glassy alloy with ultrahigh strength and soft magnetic properties," Nature Materials, vol.
For the compression tests, at least 3 samples of each glassy alloy were tested.
The glassy alloy powder used in the NanoSHIELD Coatings are high in hardness and wear resistance, but cost far less than materials such as tungsten carbide cobalt.
Joseph Poon, and Vijayabarathi Ponnambalam reported breaking the 1 cm-thickness barrier with an iron based glassy alloy including chromium, molybdenum, carbon, boron, and traces of the rare-earth element erbium.
Pang et al., "Passivation behaviour of Al88Fe6La6 glassy alloy in NaOH and [H.sub.2]S[O.sub.4] solutions," International Journal of Electrochemical Science, vol.8,pp.2983-2995, 2013.
The research in the field of metallic glasses started since the discovery of ability to amorphize Au75Si25 in 1960 by means by rapid solidification, the amorphous alloys and Bulk Metallic Glassy alloys (BMG) may be distinguished on the basis of cooling rates and the thermal response as the material is heated above room temperature [1].
25 peer-reviewed contributions in the field of material sciences are presented in this book, allowing engineering students and researchers to learn about the latest advances in the synthesis of metastable and nanostructured materials such as glassy alloys, magnetic materials, core-shell nanoparticles and melt-spun metallic ribbons.
Akihisa, "Stabilization of supercooled liquid and openingup of bulk glassy alloys," Proceedings of the Japan Academy B: Physical and Biological Sciences, vol.
The 16 selected papers discuss the synthesis, processing, characterization, and properties of materials such as glassy alloys, amorphous alloys, metallic alloys, ionic conducting metallic glasses, magnetic materials, core-shell nanoparticles, ceramic nanopowders, melt spin metallic ribbons, and polymer nanocomposites.
Until recently, expectations that lightweight, aluminum-rich glassy alloys could be substituted for denser materials in aerospace applications had been undermined by the brittle nature of these substances.
[Pd.sub.81][Si.sub.19]ingots were continuously purified by the fluxing medium including [B.sub.2][O.sub.3] in a quartz tube located in a stove with a constant temperature of 1423 K till glassy alloys were obtained.