glaze ice


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

glaze ice

[′glāz ‚īs]
(engineering)
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Glaze Ice

 

a layer of solid ice formed on the ground and on objects (for example, the trunks and branches of trees, telegraph wires) when supercooled drops of fog or rain (below 0° C) freeze on them. Glazing usually occurs at an atmospheric temperature of from 0° to —3° C (sometimes even lower), mainly on the windward side of the object. The crust of ice may be as much as several centimeters thick and may break branches and wires and destroy crops.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

glaze ice

Ice that forms when large drops of water strike and spread over a surface whose temperature is below the freezing point. Glaze ice is hard and transparent. It tends to accumulate rapidly and is often very hard and therefore more difficult to remove. Since it does not freeze instantly, the ice can form into shapes that cause significant aerodynamic penalties, making it the most hazardous form of icing. However, it is the least frequent type of ice encountered and is responsible for only about 10% of icing reports. Also called clear ice. See glaze (ii).
An Illustrated Dictionary of Aviation Copyright © 2005 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved
References in periodicals archive ?
The three-dimensional ice shapes of rotor blades are simulated in different conditions and the calculation results are compared with the experimental results in different conditions include glaze ice, rime ice, and mixed ice.
The 3D glaze ice model type of LGJ-70/10 type wire is shown in Figure 2.
The iced wire involves three different materials; the icing type due to the impact of meteorological parameters has the characteristics of randomness; in this paper, the authors studies the glaze ice which is common in Southern China [12, 13]; the physical parameters are as shown in Table 2.