glaze ice


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glaze ice

[′glāz ‚īs]
(engineering)

Glaze Ice

 

a layer of solid ice formed on the ground and on objects (for example, the trunks and branches of trees, telegraph wires) when supercooled drops of fog or rain (below 0° C) freeze on them. Glazing usually occurs at an atmospheric temperature of from 0° to —3° C (sometimes even lower), mainly on the windward side of the object. The crust of ice may be as much as several centimeters thick and may break branches and wires and destroy crops.

glaze ice

Ice that forms when large drops of water strike and spread over a surface whose temperature is below the freezing point. Glaze ice is hard and transparent. It tends to accumulate rapidly and is often very hard and therefore more difficult to remove. Since it does not freeze instantly, the ice can form into shapes that cause significant aerodynamic penalties, making it the most hazardous form of icing. However, it is the least frequent type of ice encountered and is responsible for only about 10% of icing reports. Also called clear ice. See glaze (ii).