glee


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glee,

in music, an unaccompanied song for three or more solo voices in harmony. The word glee [Anglo-Saxon, gligge or gliw=music] has been associated with vocal music from the time of the medieval gleeman or jongleur. The glee consisted of several short, individual pieces interpreting a poetic passage. The form is exclusively English and flourished mainly between 1750 and 1830, after which time it was displaced by the part songs of the Victorian composers. Glorious Apollo by Samuel Webbe (1740–1816) was the most famous glee. Gentlemen's glee societies were popular in England during the 18th cent., and women's glee societies had some vogue at the end of the century. In the United States glee clubs are simply choral organizations.

glee

a type of song originating in 18th-century England, sung by three or more unaccompanied voices
References in classic literature ?
Fanny agreed to it, and had the pleasure of seeing him continue at the window with her, in spite of the expected glee; and of having his eyes soon turned, like hers, towards the scene without, where all that was solemn, and soothing, and lovely, appeared in the brilliancy of an unclouded night, and the contrast of the deep shade of the woods.
He waited three months before daring the extravagance of a Yankee screw-driver, and his glee in the marvelous little mechanism was so keen that Dede conceived forthright a great idea.
He stuck to the colt like a plaister [sic], up ridges, down gullies; whooping and yelling with the wildest glee. Never did beggar on horseback display more headlong horsemanship.
With fiendish glee he commenced a list of torments; and while he was busied in the relation, I dropped the stone upon his intended victims and crushed them flat beneath it.
"But I see you have not escaped without a scratch," continued the Sheriff, becoming talkative through pure glee. "Here, one of you men!
But before the Doctor could say any more, the pirates began to sail the ship nearer, laughing with glee, and saying one to another, "Who shall be the first to catch the pig?"
I was half beside myself with glee; and if ever I despised a man, it was old Tom Redruth, who could do nothing but grumble and lament.
That frolicked with such glee: To men whose lives were held in gyves,
For I should pass, but all the world would be Full of desire and young delight and glee, And why should men be sad through loss of me?
We roared with laughter, holding on to one another or rolling on the ground in our glee.
The little boys whooped in glee. As she started up the street they fell in behind and marched uproariously.
The eyes did not notice me, but sparkled with glee on beholding Sancho, my beautiful black and white setter, that was coursing about the field with its muzzle to the ground.