glenoid cavity


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glenoid cavity

[¦gle‚nȯid ′kav·əd·ē]
(anatomy)
The articular surface on the scapula for articulation with the head of the humerus.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the literature, the shape variations of the glenoid cavity are determined as follows: egg-shaped, oval, teardrop, pear-shaped, round, tear with a notch, shape without a notch and elongated oval (9-12).
The mediolateral axis consists of the line between the centroid of the trigonum spinae and glenoid cavity centroid.
A- Posterior glenohumeral capsular tightness During arm elevation in the healthy shoulder, the HH remains centred and rotates downward in the glenoid cavity while the scapula rotates superiorly (around horizontal axis perpendicular to it), internally (around a vertical axis through its plane) and tilt posteriorly (around horizontal axis in the plane of it).15 Healthy RC muscles and lax posterior and inferior capsule16 are prerequisites for the glenoid centred rotation of HH during elevation.
In the oldest cadaveric specimens (group 3), these changes were seen around the entire glenoid cavity (Pfahler et al 2003).
The rotator cuff muscles not only compress the humeral head into the glenoid cavity but also cotension the ligaments of the shoulder.
Abducts the humerus (i.e., raises it away from the midline of the body) and stabilizes the head of the humerus in the glenoid cavity (the point of articulation in the scapula).
They have started with the shoulder joint, where the knobbed end of the upper arm bone - the humerus -- fits into the concave glenoid cavity, a shallow "socket" along the upper, outer edge of the shoulder blade.
Glenoid cavity is considered as the head of the scapula.
While the vast majority of scapular fractures are managed quite successfully without surgery, most agree that surgical management should be considered for severely displaced injuries--most commonly: (1) significantly displaced fractures of the glenoid cavity (glenoid rim and glenoid fossa), (2) significantly displaced fractures of the glenoid neck, and (3) double disruption of the superior shoulder suspensory complex (SSSC) in which one or more elements of the scapula are significantly displaced.