glenoid cavity

(redirected from glenoid fossa)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Wikipedia.

glenoid cavity

[¦gle‚nȯid ′kav·əd·ē]
(anatomy)
The articular surface on the scapula for articulation with the head of the humerus.
References in periodicals archive ?
Grade 0 and 1 could not be examined in panoramic radiography, since the posterior aspect of glenoid fossa is usually superimposed by adjacent structures.
Since these parameters were characterized by long acromia with superiorly-inclined glenoid fossae, it was understood that the smaller deltoid moment arm may result in the decentralization of the force vector on the glenoid fossa (Moor et al., 2014a; Viehofer et al.).
In this regard, Figure 5 depicts the damaged regions for a specimen of reference, consisting in an almost circular damaged area at the mandibular component that seems to be affected by a combination of plastic deformation and wear, and a horizontally elongated damaged zone at the glenoid fossa component that gives the impression of being mainly affected by wear.
The presumed etiology, supported by imaging, is an arthropathy that slowly weakened the TMJ causing progressive intracranial swelling and edema deep to the glenoid fossa. Intraoperative pathology indicated non-inflammatory degenerative joint pathology without cellular infiltrates, indicating a diagnosis of TMJ osteoarthritis.
A further advantage for TJR is the possibility, when zygomatic arch and glenoid fossa are absent, to plan the fossa component custom-fitted to the base of the skull and lateral temporal bone morphology.
Dissection of superficial temporalis muscle (Figure 5) was done and it was atraumatically auto rotated towards the joint space and placed between the osteotomised segments in a fashion fascia directing towards glenoid fossa and muscle directing towards the shaped condyle.
CBCT 3D Imaging Clarifies the Position of the Condyle in the Glenoid Fossa. The condylar position in the glenoid fossa is well defined by CBCT images.
The 3D measuring method was used to assess the morphology of condyle, but other TMJ structures, such as glenoid fossa and articular eminence, were not included in the previous studies.
There was an inability to close mouth, absence of condyle from the glenoid fossa resulting in a palpable preauricular depression, and a prominent appearing lower jaw.
Deep notching of gonial angle, narrowing of glenoid fossa, and presence of a supernumerary tooth in right maxillary third molar region were other findings (Figure 1(c)).