glide ratio


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glide ratio

The ratio of the forward distance traveled to the vertical distance an aircraft descends when gliding without any power. Also called a gliding ratio.
An Illustrated Dictionary of Aviation Copyright © 2005 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved
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It's helpful to know your glide ratio as an angle using the 60:1 rule.
A company spokesperson for Zvezda informed Armada how the ram-air technology-based parachute provided operators with a glide ratio of 2:1 (the horizontal distance of an object divided by its change in altitude) and ability to steer onto designated drop zones.
Despite an impressive 53:1 glide ratio, it's not regarded as a competition glider, although it has set world records.
For each glide, 10 variables were recorded: 1) height of launch (m), 2) height of landing (m), 3) vertical drop (m), 4) horizontal distance (m) 5) air speed (m [s.sup.-1]), 6) ground speed (m [s.sup.-1]), 7) glide ratio, 8) glide angle([degrees]), 9) girth at breast height (GBH) of launching tree and 10) girth at breast height (GBH) of landing tree (cm) (Vernes 2001, Stafford et al.
It has three sets of wings - 1 pair of tilt wings and 2 pairs of fixed wings, providing the aircraft with an excellent glide ratio and a low stall speed, allowing for short take off and landing as well as vertical flight.
Other features include the option to assign customised data fields to display GPS ground speed, GPS track, distance, estimated time enroute, bearing, glide ratio and much more.
He located the nearest divert airfield at Myrtle Beach, swiftly attained a 1:1 glide ratio, and attempted to retrieve local weather data which was temporarily unavailable.
The MC-6 has a lower rate of descent, lower opening shock, reduced canopy damage, a better turn ratio and a better glide ratio than the MC1-1C.
The history of "personal flight," as Abrams tells it, falls into three categories: the largely unsuccessful, often feather draped, tower jumpers of centuries past; the somewhat successful canvas-clad parachuting showman of the 1930s and '40s--known as "batmen"; and the largely successful wingsuited skydivers of today who can fly for several minutes at a 2:1 glide ratio before opening their parachutes.
Parafoil airdrop systems can deliver loads weighing up to 21 tons from aerial platforms to target areas on the ground using a glide ratio of 3 to 1.
Normally, in a powered aircraft or one with a glide ratio better than a Lady Kenmore, this is not a problem.
Best glide ratio generally comes with a higher speed at the heavier weights.