globe

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globe,

spherical map of the earth (terrestrial globe) or the sky (celestial globe). The terrestrial globe provides the only graphic representation of the areas of the earth without significant distortion or inaccuracy in shape, direction, or relative size. However, the flattening of the earth at the poles and its slight bulge below the equator are normally disregarded in the construction of a globe. Probably the earliest globe was constructed by the Greek geographer Crates of Mallus in the 2d cent. B.C. Few attempts were made to construct globes in the Middle Ages, although Strabo and Ptolemy, at the beginning of the Christian era, had formulated precise and detailed instructions for doing so. The first globes of modern times were made in the late 15th cent. by Martin Behaim of Nuremberg and Leonardo da Vinci. One of the earliest globes constructed (1506) after the discovery of America is in the New York Public Library. A celestial globe is a model of the celestial spherecelestial sphere,
imaginary sphere of infinite radius with the earth at its center. It is used for describing the positions and motions of stars and other objects. For these purposes, any astronomical object can be thought of as being located at the point where the line of sight
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 intended primarily to show the positions of the stars.

Globe

A spherical ornament, fabricated out of solid wood or a metal shell, usually found on the top of steeples and cupolas.

Globe

 

a model of the earth depicting its entire surface and preserving a geometrical approximation of the contours and relationship of areas. The most useful scales of a globe range from 1:30,000,000 to 1:80,000,000. Globes are extremely varied in their cartographic content. The most widely used are physical geographic globes. Occasionally, relief globes with molded surfaces representing mountains and uplands are produced.

The first geographical globe is considered to be the one made by M. Behaim in 1492. In the 17th and 18th centuries globes were used for navigation of the seas. With the appearance of sea maps and sailing directions, globes lost their usefulness, but they are widely employed as educational visual aids (school globes).

What does it mean when you dream about a globe?

Having control of one’s world can be indicated by a stationary globe. A spinning globe often symbolizes the opposite situation—that one’s world is out of control.

globe

[glōb]
(mapping)
A sphere on the surface of which is a map of the world.

globe, light globe

1. A transparent or diffusing enclosure (usually of glass) to protect a light source, to diffuse and redirect the light, or to change the color of the light.

globe

in Christ child’s hands signifies power and dominion. [Christian Symbolism: de Bles, 25]

globe

1. a sphere on which a map of the world or the heavens is drawn or represented
2. a planet or some other astronomical body
3. Austral, NZ, and South African an electric light bulb
References in classic literature ?
So in accepting the leading of the sentiments, it is not what we believe concerning the immortality of the soul or the like, but the universal impulse to believe, that is the material circumstance and is the principal fact in the history of the globe.
In an apartment of the great temple of Denderah, some fifty years ago, there was discovered upon the granite ceiling a sculptured and painted planisphere, abounding in centaurs, griffins, and dolphins, similar to the grotesque figures on the celestial globe of the moderns.
Look downward on that Globe whose hither side With light from hence, though but reflected, shines; That place is Earth the seat of Man, that light His day, which else as th' other Hemisphere Night would invade, but there the neighbouring Moon (So call that opposite fair Starr) her aide Timely interposes, and her monthly round Still ending, still renewing, through mid Heav'n; With borrowd light her countenance triform Hence fills and empties to enlighten th' Earth, And in her pale dominion checks the night.
An account of this lecture was sent by telephone to The Boston Globe, which announced the next morning--
To those people in the huts and villages of half the globe struggling to break the bonds of mass misery: we pledge our best efforts to help them help themselves, for whatever period is required.
For man's everyday needs, it would have been quite enough to have the ordinary human consciousness, that is, half or a quarter of the amount which falls to the lot of a cultivated man of our unhappy nineteenth century, especially one who has the fatal ill-luck to inhabit Petersburg, the most theoretical and intentional town on the whole terrestrial globe.
She is "missing" now, after a sinister but, from the point of view of her owners, a useful career extending over many years, and, I should say, across every ocean of our globe.
In the discharge of thy place, set before thee the best examples; for imitation is a globe of precepts.
Captain Marryatt writes: "I do not know a spot on the globe which so much astonishes and delights upon first arrival as Madeira.
And there were present, also, those fearless travellers and explorers whose energetic temperaments had borne them through every quarter of the globe, many of them grown old and worn out in the service of science.
The ball represented the terrestrial globe and the stick in his other hand a scepter.
But, happily for her, the face turned toward the terrestrial globe is illuminated by it with an intensity equal to that of fourteen moons.