gloss


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gloss

[Gr.,=tongue], explanatory note on a word or words of a text, usually written between the lines or in a margin of a manuscript. In copying a manuscript, a copyist sometimes incorporated a gloss in the text, so that the copy departed from the original. The gloss may be in a language different from that of the text. Old glosses on the Bible have value as evidence of tradition, as have glosses in civil and canon law.

Gloss

A property of paint finish that determines its reflective quality; either shiny, semireflective, soft finish, or flat.

Gloss

 

(1) Translation or explanation of an incomprehensible word or expression, primarily in the works of ancient writers. Glosses were first used by the Greeks in the study of Homer’s poetry. The so-called Homeric glosses of the Alexandrian period (Zenodotus of Ephesus) enjoyed wide renown. Later, glosses were used mainly in the explication of individual biblical passages and of juridical texts. The so-called Malberg Gloss, which is composed of separate Frankish words and expressions joined to the Latin text of the Salic Law, is the most ancient monument of the German language, and the Reichenau Glosses, which were attached to the Latin Bible, are the first monument of the French language. Since the 17th century, glosses have been studied as valuable linguistic material.

(2) In Old Spanish poetry, a poem consisting of four stanzas (mainly the décima) and the four-line epigraph (called a motto) preceding them, each line of which completed the corresponding stanza. An example is the poem “On the Beauty Unhappy in Marriage” by C. de Castillejo.

gloss

[gläs]
(optics)
The ratio of the light specularly reflected from a surface to the total light reflected.

gloss

The degree of surface luster; ranges from a matte surface practically without sheen to an almost mirror-like glossy finish; intermediate conditions (in increasing order of glossiness) are: flat, eggshell, semigloss, and full gloss or high gloss.
References in periodicals archive ?
Part III, 'Glossing Practice', contains an analysis of multiple glosses to present tense forms of beon by Christine Bolze, and another by Sara Pons-Sanz on the principles of ordering of double or multiple semantic glosses.
But if the cavity steel has been polished as high as possible and the part is still not at the gloss needed, processing or material changes will be necessary.
Gloss succeeded his late father, George Gloss - a well-known figure both in Boston and in national antiquarian circles.
Kustom Group has developed KB-3164 Gloss Litho OPV for Digital.
From a physical perspective, gloss is generally associated with the surface light reflection of an object in the specular angle which is the opposite to the incident angle as measured from the normal (1).
Rating 3/5 * Balm Shelter Tinted Gloss SPF17 in Daddy''s Girl, pounds 15 (www.thebalm.com)
Using micro fine pure Diamond Particles, NIVEA Diamond Gloss is the ideal hair care system for women whose hair has become dull and lifeless by constant brushing, blow-drying and sun exposure.
A ZENA SAYS: Well, I spoke to a very helpful man at Johnstone's Paints (01924 354100, www.johnstonestrade.co.uk) who informed me that you need to prepare the gloss surfaces with a Wet and Dry Sandpaper, which you can get from most DIY stores.
A uniform look is achieved by requiring suppliers to adhere to very tight tolerances for color and gloss specifications for the various components.
APPLICATION: A brief presentation of this new method will be valuable for those within the paper industry who are trying to understand why there is more than one standard procedure for measuring gloss.