gloss

(redirected from glosses)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Idioms.
Related to glosses: glosses over

gloss

[Gr.,=tongue], explanatory note on a word or words of a text, usually written between the lines or in a margin of a manuscript. In copying a manuscript, a copyist sometimes incorporated a gloss in the text, so that the copy departed from the original. The gloss may be in a language different from that of the text. Old glosses on the Bible have value as evidence of tradition, as have glosses in civil and canon law.

Gloss

A property of paint finish that determines its reflective quality; either shiny, semireflective, soft finish, or flat.

Gloss

 

(1) Translation or explanation of an incomprehensible word or expression, primarily in the works of ancient writers. Glosses were first used by the Greeks in the study of Homer’s poetry. The so-called Homeric glosses of the Alexandrian period (Zenodotus of Ephesus) enjoyed wide renown. Later, glosses were used mainly in the explication of individual biblical passages and of juridical texts. The so-called Malberg Gloss, which is composed of separate Frankish words and expressions joined to the Latin text of the Salic Law, is the most ancient monument of the German language, and the Reichenau Glosses, which were attached to the Latin Bible, are the first monument of the French language. Since the 17th century, glosses have been studied as valuable linguistic material.

(2) In Old Spanish poetry, a poem consisting of four stanzas (mainly the décima) and the four-line epigraph (called a motto) preceding them, each line of which completed the corresponding stanza. An example is the poem “On the Beauty Unhappy in Marriage” by C. de Castillejo.

gloss

[gläs]
(optics)
The ratio of the light specularly reflected from a surface to the total light reflected.

gloss

The degree of surface luster; ranges from a matte surface practically without sheen to an almost mirror-like glossy finish; intermediate conditions (in increasing order of glossiness) are: flat, eggshell, semigloss, and full gloss or high gloss.
References in periodicals archive ?
Notwithstanding, glossing can be of much greater learning value, provided it is a cognitive act performed by learners themselves; this condition is fulfilled when learners are actively involved in creating their own glosses to satisfy their individual learning needs.
Secondly, since glosses facilitate comprehension of the text being studied and increase reading comprehension fluency it follows that the perceived success in reading gives learners a sense of achievement and psychological comfort.
The inventory of interrogatives used in these glosses suggests a possible origin for this glossing system.
Thus, for example, quomodo glosses adverbs, prepositional phrases, ablative absolutes - elements of discourse usually classified in quite separate places in medieval and modern instructional grammars but not in modern functional accounts of syntax.
There are, for instance, gazetteer-like entries for all the towns in Campania with links to Hadrian, as well as considerable notices for every source which the glosses utilize.
Its stated purpose was simple: to fill in the missing arguments in some of his Spanish glosses for his inquisitors.
In what follows, we are limiting ourselves to the Jewish commentarial and lexicographic glosses on the literal meaning of the Hebrew tsammah Of course, there is a complex array of allegorical and mystical interpretations of the Song of Songs in the Jewish exegetical tradition: the Midrashic, Talmudic, and Targumic readings; the great medieval commentaries; the philosophical and Kabbalistic interpretations.
4) Hargreaves and Clark point out that the language of these glosses is very archaic for the late twelfth century and suggest mechanical copying from an exemplar; possibly the gloss planned for this manuscript was a more recent or more carefully revised text.
Compared to many other glosses the container is kind of small but even so, the gloss is long-lasting.
All the glosses are able to buy from larger chemists such as Boots or department stores such as Fenwick, John Lewis and House of Fraser.
The Riverside and Bevington editions have glosses at the foot of their double-column pages.
Glosses became the "site" on which new relationships were established.