Glossopharyngeal Nerve

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glossopharyngeal nerve

[¦gläs·ō·fə′rin·jē·əl ‚nərv]
(neuroscience)
The ninth cranial nerve in vertebrates; a paired mixed nerve that supplies autonomic innervation to the parotid gland and contains sensory fibers from the posterior one-third of the tongue and the anterior pharynx.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Glossopharyngeal Nerve

 

the ninth pair of cranial nerves. It consists of sensory, motor, and secretory fibers. The nuclei of the nerve are located in the medulla oblongata. The common trunk of the nerve emerges from the cranial cavity through the jugular foramen together with the vagus and accessory nerves and internal jugular vein.

The glossopharyngeal nerve supplies the mucous membrane of the radix linguae, pharynx, soft palate, eustachian tube, and tympanic cavity with sensory fibers. The taste fibers that innervate the posterior third of the tongue enter the peripheral portion of the taste receptors. The motor and secretory fibers innervate some pharyngeal muscles and the parotid gland, respectively. One of the sensory branches of the glossopharyngeal nerve also carries impulses from the carotid sinus, thereby participating in the regulation of blood circulation.

Injury to the glossopharyngeal nerve impairs swallowing and taste. In some cases, compression of the nerve causes neuralgia, manifested chiefly by pain in the regions innervated by it.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
The CCG did not communicate with the carotid sinus branch of the glossopharyngeal nerve, the accessory nerve, and the cervical spinal nerves (Figs.
In the current investigation, the long axis of the lateral surface of the CCG was crossed by the glossopharyngeal nerve. Dougherty et al.
Another important target in his surgical work was the rehabilitation of swallowing and improvement of the voice in cases of paralysis of caudal cranial nerves, particularly of the vagus and glossopharyngeal nerves.