glottis

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Related to glottic: glottic web

glottis

the vocal apparatus of the larynx, consisting of the two true vocal cords and the opening between them
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

glottis

[′gläd·əs]
(anatomy)
The opening between the margins of the vocal folds.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Our hypothesis was that as a result of its improved glottic vision; the McGrath VL would reduce the time taken to intubate patients undergoing cesarean section.
Furthermore, the intubation time, the number of intubation attempts, need for stylette or additional manipulation, glottic view (Cormack--Lehane) and traumatic complications caused by intubation procedure were recorded as secondary outcomes.
Treatment depends on the degree of airway obstruction at the glottic level.
It allows characterizing the glottic source regarding its muscular and muco-undulatory functioning and its vocal quality, seeing that some alterations are better observed in the sustained emission of isolated phonemes [6,8,16].
If the protuberance is an appropriate point for the suture placement, a 21# needle will be introduced into the glottic lumen and the 2# nylon stitch will be carried through the needle canal, and then into the lumen.
Stroboscopy will show stiff vocal folds, a reduced mucosal wave, poor vibratory function of the vocal fold, and glottic insufficiency.
Regarding the location of the tumor, the glottic region (208 patients, 50.1%), the supraglottic region (113 patients, 27.2%), the subglottic region (13 patients, 3.1%), and more than one region (81 patients, 19.5%) of the patients were involved.
The types of the glottic stenosis developed in the patients are presented in Figure 13.
The surgeons anticipated that the glottic and subglottic granulation tissue may cause bleeding or airway obstruction.