glycosuria

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glycosuria

[‚glī·kō′shu̇r·ē·ə]
(medicine)
Presence of sugar in the urine.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
(4,5) Consequently, excess glucose that cannot be reabsorbed is excreted, resulting in glucosuria.
Given significant natriuresis and hypophosphatemia, mild tubular proteinuria, and glucosuria in the absence of hyperglycemia, patient was felt to have developed Fanconi syndrome and RSW.
They proposed that there is an initial loss of weight prior to the diagnosis of type 1 diabetes because of excessive glucosuria and insulin deficiency, and after insulin is initiated, the lost weight is quickly regained, often with additional weight gain with intensive therapy.
[4] Sustained hyperglycemia increases the glucose in the glomerular filtrate, and glucose that has not been reabsorbed through the proximal tubule appears in the urine as glucosuria. [5] Glucosuria induces an elevation in urinary osmotic pressure, which reduces renal water reabsorption, leading to polyuria.
Obese persons have been shown to lose weight with GLP1RA, and the weight loss experienced with exenatide or liraglutide is dependent upon baseline body weight.24,25 Weight loss documented with SGLT2i is due to a combination of calorie loss through glucosuria, and loss of fat mass.26-28 Pioglitazone and older sulfonylureas can increase weight, and this is a disadvantage in already overweight or obese persons.
Nephrotoxic effects have been reported for citrinin include reduced glomerular filtration rate and renal blood flow resulting in increased blood urea nitrogen concentration, urinary lactic acid dehydrogenase, aspartate amino transferase, and isocitric dehydrogenase activities, as well as proteinuria, glucosuria, lowered urinary specific gravity, and the presence of necrotic cells in the urinary sediment (Kogika et al, 1996).
Previously reported comparisons between self-reported diabetes status in our study and test results for glycosylated hemoglobin and glucosuria showed that only 1% of the individuals without self-reported diabetes tested positive on urinary glucose, whereas 61% of the individuals with self-reported diabetes tested positive (p < 0.01), which indicated good questionnaire validity (Chen Y et al.
Offspring that developed abnormal glucose tolerance, glucosuria, and diabetic complications were included in the study.
Urine analysis revealed bilirubinuria (+ ++), glucosuria (++), proteinuria (++), ketonuria (++++), isosthenuria and acidic urine pH.