Glulam


Also found in: Acronyms.

glulam

[′glü‚läm]
(materials)
A material fabricated by joining two or more layers of wood with an adhesive so that the grains of all the layers are approximately parallel.

Glulam

Glue laminated lumber, normally a structural timber member, glued and laid up from fairly small sections and lengths to either large cross sections, long lengths, curved shapes, or a combination of these.
References in periodicals archive ?
Glulam, or glue-laminated timber, is the same engineered wood used in the new Mactan International Airport.
(i) Glulam webs made of Picea abies, with a strength class of GL28 h [27].
The smoke treatment is one choice for reducing the use of more toxic preservatives to increase glulam resistance to subterranean termite attack.
It was introduced the following elastic constants: elastic modulus parallel to grain E0, modulus of elasticity across the grain [E.sub.90], shear modulus [G.sub.0], Poisson coefficient [[mu].sub.90.0], [[mu].sub.0.90], which are determined on specimens made of glulam beams of frames after the test.
Made from sticking together smaller pieces of wood to create structural elements with a higher tensile strength than steel, glulam can resist compression better than concrete, but weighs a lot less and is more sustainable.
That same year, Johnsson, Blanksvard and Carolin [10] worked on some glulam members strengthened by carbon fibre reinforcement by first running pull-out tests on four pairs of glulam members at four different anchoring lengths.
The team proposed using glulam, which would be able to withstand fire in a similar fashion to steel.
The group is visiting the Middle East to witness the engineering marvels undertaken with New Zealand timber and products such as glulam (glued laminated timber manufactured to engineered standards) in this region.
Project materials include structural glulam beam stringers, walnut treads and risers, sapele grip rail and newel in fills, forged steel balustrade.
The roof is supported by distinctive tapering Glulam beams, flitch plates and steel cruciform columns.
Engineered wood composites such as glulam and LVL are increasingly used in conditions with moderate decay hazard such as indoor swimming pools and ice arenas, supporting building overhangs and sometimes projecting beyond the roof-line.