glutamate

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Related to glutamates: L-Glutamic Acid, L-glutamate

glutamate

[′glüd·ə‚māt]
(biochemistry)
A salt or ester of glutamic acid.
References in periodicals archive ?
concluded that in mice the plasma concentration of glutamate must exceed a threshold of 75 micromol/dl for neuronal damage to occur (25).
It has been shown that the route of administration of glutamate has an effect on the concentration of glutamate in the blood.
daily intake, their plasma levels of glutamate are 57 times less than the levels at which damage occurs in mice.
Life Science Research Office (1993), "Tentative Report: Adequacy of Existing Scientific Information on Possible Adverse Reactions to Monosodium Glutamate," Prepared for the Food and Drug Administration under Contract No.
"It is our firm conviction," Krukar continued, "that there is no scientific evidence that presupposes the glutamate in hydrolyzed proteins or yeast extracts has any adverse reaction on the majority of consumers, but definitely imparts a pleasing flavor sensation in consumed food products.
The human body does not treat glutamate which is added to foods any differently than the naturally occurring glutamate found in food.
As stated by the European Community's Scientific Committee for Food in June 1991, "Infants, including prematures, have been shown to metabolize glutamate as efficiently as adults and therefore do not display any special susceptibility to elevated oral intakes of glutamate."
Free glutamate is abundant in human breast milk, which contains approximately 10 times more free glutamate than cow's milk.
It has concluded that there is some evidence that mild reactions to MSG may occur in a small portion of the population, but it is "not aware of any scientific evidence that establishes that monosodium glutamate causes particularly severe adverse reactions, or that reactions to low doses of monosodium glutamate occur and are life threatening." (Federal Register June 21, 1991)
Monsodium glutamate can also be used to reduce the salt content of many foods--an important factor, given the recent controversy over high levels of sodium in ready meals.
The food ingredient monosodium glutamate does, as its name implies, contain some sodium--approximately one third of the equivalent quantity in table salt--but is used in far lower amounts.
In most foods, the level of salt reduction that can be achieved is 20%-40%, although research published in the Journal of Food Science has shown that glutamate can contribute to a reduction of up to 50%.

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