glycogenolysis


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glycogenolysis

[′glī·kə·jə′näl·ə·səs]
(biochemistry)
The metabolic breakdown of glycogen.
References in periodicals archive ?
According to them the high blood glucose level shows the disrupted metabolism of carbohydrate which may be due to increase in the process of glycogenolysis, perhaps mediated by adrenocorticotropic hormone, glycogen hormone and lower insulin activity.
(1996) Blunting the rise in body temperature reduces muscle glycogenolysis during exercise in humans.
Therefore, the higher basal LGR may be the result of increased liver glycogenolysis, as glycogen stores could be enhanced because of the long-term hyperglycemia, the predominant feature of non-insulin treated T1DM (27).
Due to action of [alpha]2 adrenergic receptors there is decrease in insulin release and cause inhibition of [beta] cells of the islets of Langerhans in the pancreas.8 Adrenergic stimulation of [beta] receptors causes stimulation of glycogenolysis resulting in cyclic AMP-dependent activation of phosphorylation.
Other effects of excessive VIP levels include inhibition of gastric acid secretion, bone resorption, glycogenolysis and vasodilation.
Glucose gradually becomes hepatic glycogenolysis during fasting, in which ketogenesis becomes the main source of energy.
Metformin inhibits hepatic gluconeogenesis and glycogenolysis and enhances peripheral glucose utilisation in patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes [2,3].
Isoproterenol is known to cause glycogenolysis and insulin resistance.
This activation promotes glycogen formation and storage in the liver and blocks glycogenolysis, increasing hepatic glycogen stores during hyperglycemia.
The lack of this enzyme impairs glycogen breakdown (glycogenolysis); thus affected people are unable to use glycogen as an energy source in skeletal muscles.
Insulin decreases blood glucose level by increasing its peripheral consumption, stimulates glycogen synthesis and inhibits glycogenolysis and gluconeogenesis.
Glycogen phosphorylase (GP) is bound to glycogen in sarcoplasmic reticulum and catalyzes the first step of glycogenolysis after activation, which involves the separation of glucose-1-phosphate from glycogen.