gnat-catcher

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gnat-catcher

or

gnatwren:

see kingletkinglet,
common name for members of a subfamily of five species of Old and New World warblers, similar to the thrushes and the Old World flycatchers. Kinglets are small birds (4 in./10 cm) with soft, fluffy, olive or grayish green plumage and bright crown patches.
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References in periodicals archive ?
These included Northern Cardinal, American Goldfinch, Tufted Titmouse, Eastern Towhee, Blue-gray Gnatcatcher, Common Grackle, and Black-capped Chickadee.
Other key species within the whole group of 32 include the California gnatcatcher, the arroyo toad, and the tidewater goby.
250) The Coastal California gnatcatcher, Polioptila californica californica, is a bird native to the United States and Mexico.
These birds included 1 vulture, 10 raptors, 1 quail, 6 doves, 1 cuckoo, 3 owls, 1 swift, 2 hummingbirds, 5 woodpeckers, 7 flycatchers, 1 shrike, 2 vireos, 1 jay, 2 crows, 6 swallows, 1 chickadee, 1 titmouse, 5 wrens, 1 kinglet, 1 gnatcatcher, 3 thrushes, 3 mimic thrushes, 1 starling, 1 pipit, 1 waxwing, 11 warblers, 1 tanager, 13 sparrows, 1 cardinal, 1 grosbeak, 2 buntings, 1 dickcissel, 2 blackbirds, 1 meadowlark, 2 grackles, 1 cowbird, 1 oriole, 1 goldfinch, 1 finch, and 1 weaver finch.
The black-tailed gnatcatcher (Polioptila melanura) is sedentary in these desert regions, where it nests in large clumps of vegetation, and it resembles a small warbler.
By telling their story she hopes to inspire folks everywhere: "For each of us, regardless of where we live, there is a river, a mountain range, a beach, a whale, a peregrine, a gnatcatcher that, if we merely give our time as a witness to loss, will gradually unite the veins of its existence with our own .
The cost of environmental measures came to $67 million with CCC contributing $25 million for wildlife undercrossings, wetlands replace ment, and enhancement of the Cali fornia gnatcatcher habitat.
Signs of this ploy were apparent as early as March 1993, when Babbitt blessed the "win-win" habitat-conservation plan, whereby endangered species such as the California gnatcatcher would coexist on coastal lands with developers.
Between Texas and southern California, mtDNA restriction site studies reveal no geographic differentiation in the verdin, black-tailed gnatcatcher, or cactus wren.
Whether it's an owl or a gnatcatcher or a salmon, these creatures are not responsible for the decline of industries.
A California gnatcatcher nest with eggs on the site (a protected species at the time)