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gnome

(nōm), in folklore, tiny subterranean creature associated with mines and quarries. Usually represented as misshapen, frequently as hunchbacked, gnomes are said to be guardians of hidden treasures.

Gnome

 

a moral admonition set in verse or rhythmical prose. The gnome was used primarily in Eastern (Oriental) literatures—ancient Hebrew, Indian, Arabic, and Persian. Gnomes were popular in ancient Greece, especially in elegiac poetry, in the form of distichs or hexameters. Homer interspersed gnomes throughout his epics; Hesiod also wrote them. An unusually large number are included in a collection attributed to Theognis of Megara. In the literature of ancient Rome the dicta of Publilius Syrus and the so-called Dicta Catonis may be regarded as gnomes.

REFERENCES

Wilpert, G. von. Sachwörterbuch der Literatur. Stuttgart, 1964.
Kindermann, H., and M. Dietrich. Lexikon der Weltliteratur. Zürich, 1951.

A. I. FIURSTENBERG

What does it mean when you dream about a gnome?

Gnomes symbolize the magical world of wishes and make-believe related to one’s “inner child,” the inner treasures that the dreamer may possess.

gnome

ground-dwelling spirit in Rosicrucian philosophy. [Medieval Hist.: Brewer Dictionary, 468]
See: Earth

gnome

one of a species of legendary creatures, usually resembling small misshapen old men, said to live in the depths of the earth and guard buried treasure

GNOME

GNOME

(GNU Network Object Modeling Environment) A GUI-based user interface for Linux and other Unix environments that grew out of the GNU Project. Providing an alternative to the KDE interface, GNOME is either pronounced "guh-nome" or "nome." Companies such as Red Hat, Inc. (www.redhat.com) and Ximian (www.ximian.com), formerly Helix Code, Inc. and acquired by Novell, support the GNOME environment. For more information, visit www.gnome.org. See Linux, KDE and GNU.


A GNOME Desktop
Similar to other graphical interfaces such as on the Mac and Windows, this is a sample GNOME desktop with an open application. (Screen shot courtesy of Helix Code, Inc.)
References in periodicals archive ?
Escher, whose "Encounter," where two gnomish figures meet and meld with perfect, interlocking economy, bears an uncanny resemblance to a roda.
The 68-year-old Wada cuts a gnomish figure as he pads into his cavernous living room, a gaggle of aides fluttering in his wake.
As a small child, she became fascinated by a gnomish hunchback with delicate, skillful hands who used to come to fix the locks.
Instead Sam is recruited to join a band of pirates whose mission is to locate a gnomish infiltrator in the palace.
When Tolkien started to write the Book of Lost Tales, he still featured elves and fairies as similar concepts; and the contemporary Gnomish and Qenya Lexicons provide more specific information about them.
His gnomish figure in dishevelled uniform with its carefully folded keffiyah and incipient beard became instantly recognizable, an icon for millions, an Arab Guevara though far from handsome, all too obviously mortal and fallible--the portrait if you like to Guevara's Dorian Gray--and for that reason the more potent, more than just a poster on the wall of a student bedroom.
The temptation to identify the two, to see the artist as an apparatus, a wire eye, or gnomish version of Leonardo's geometric man, was enjoined by the artist's own representative.
Wilson's gnomish knoll of a set leaves too little free play space, and other design contribs (aside from Todd Roehrman's occasionally witty costumes) prove handsome but earthbound.
Among these cognates, we have Gnomish crunc "crow" (PE11 27); Qenya karon "crow" (PE12 45); and the root KARKA- "crow", later emended to KORKA- (Lost Road 362).