public

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public

go public
a. (of a private company) to issue shares for subscription by the public
b. to reveal publicly hitherto confidential information
References in periodicals archive ?
com/updates-on-our-work-to-build-a-21st-century-company/) statement , Airbnb CEO and Head of Community Brian Chesky said the company will not go public this year.
Periods of higher uncertainty can also provide firms with a comprehensive investment prospect, offering them better opportunities to go public.
According to statistics compiled by the Taiwan Stock Exchange (TWSE), as of the end of November, 42 overseas Taiwanese firms had applied to go public via primary listing, half of them from the electronics, biotechnology and medical sectors.
Therefore, the president's decision to go public must be conditional on the president's position being popular.
Fighting fit: Liam and Strike partner Danny Ball on Britain's Got Talent love: Gemma and Liam go public at Young Scot bash
may be the only major firm on track to go public during fiscal 2009 until March 2010.
China-based Founder Securities is expected to go public in 2009.
Khalid Maniar, founder and managing partner of auditing and business advising firm Horwath Mak, agreed that with the current IPO laws such as in the UAE, it is not surprising that family businesses in the region are hesitant to go public "because they don't want to lose control of their businesses.
When we start up an investment in China, we have to put in place all the mechanisms to take it public on the Nasdaq or NYSE (New York Stock Exchange) or in Hong Kong because the markets in China won't be reformed in the next seven to 10 years to allow startups to go public inside China and get the money out," Doll explains.
Com" now that companies with no products and no profits, such as the Palo Alto concern Nanosys, are starting to go public.
NewCastle Investment Corporation became the first New York area firm to go public since early July of last summer.
In an attempt to forgo the lengthy SEC registration procedure with its associated planning and costs, many companies wishing to go public are now engaging in something called a "reverse merger," or "reversing into a public shell.