go-devil


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go-devil

[′gō ‚dev·əl]
(engineering)
A device inserted in a pipe or hole for purposes such as cleaning or for detonating an explosive.
A sled for moving logs or cultivating.
A large rake for gathering hay.
A small railroad car used for transporting workers and materials.

go-devil

A device used to clean a pipeline by placing it at the pump end of the pipeline and forcing it through the pipe by water pressure.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Little boy tales of runaway teams, turning too short and upending the tool, spankings by papa for not tending to business, barbed wire fences, stray skunks and other weird happenings all involved the lowly go-devil cultivator.
As Delbert points out, the Go-Devil was used to flatten the ridges, undercut weeds and put soil around the plants.
The original Go-Devil is built to run in as little as 4 inches of water while maintaining a high load capacity.
Why this device was called a go-devil, however, remains a mystery.
Go-Devil Surface Drive Engines are engineered to power through thick mud and nasty environments to get to where the ducks are hanging out.
In 1977, Warren Coco introduced a revolutionary mode of propulsion that took the 'fowling community by storm: the Go-Devil engine.
Go-Devil Manufacturing Twin Surface-Drives are powered by 23 horsepower Vanguard engines.
125" aluminum hull and well-earned reputation for quality, Go-Devil boats are as popular among duck hunters as ever.
Founded by legendary duck man Warren Coco, Go-Devil is one of the leading names in the motor industry.
Go-Devil builds duck boats for traditional longtails and high-performance surface-drive mud motors.
Go-Devil is one of the few manufacturers that builds duck boats for traditional longtails and high-performance surface-drive mud motors.