going


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going

[′gō·iŋ]
(civil engineering)
On a staircase, the distance between the faces of two successive risers.

going

(Brit.) 1. The horizontal distance between two consecutive risers of a step. 2. Of a stair or flight, the horizontal distance between the first and last risers, i.e., the run.
References in classic literature ?
I am going to Sparta and to Pylos to see if I can hear anything about the return of my dear father.
When they had brought the things as he told them, Telemachus went on board, Minerva going before him and taking her seat in the stern of the vessel, while Telemachus sat beside her.
Seth was silent from utter astonishment: he knew nothing that could suggest to him a reason for Hetty's going away.
I can't tell thee where I'm going, and thee must say to her I'm gone on business as nobody is to know anything about.
"Are you really going to the theater?" he said, trying not to look at her.
We passed another town before daylight, and I was going out again; but it was high ground, so I didn't go.
We warn't going to borrow it when there warn't anybody around, the way pap would do, for that might set people after us.
I'm going to be a good teacher-- and I'm going to save your eyesight.
I was very well dressed, and had my gold watch as well as she; so I left the footman, and I puts myself in a rank with this young lady, having stayed till she had taken one double turn in the Mall, and was going forward again; by and by I saluted her by her name, with the title of Lady Betty.
I didn't know he was going to," cried Dora, blushing scarlet.
Isabella corroborated it: "My dearest Catherine, you cannot form an idea of the dirt; come, you must go; you cannot refuse going now."
It "forecasts" precisely what happened yesterday or a the day before, and precisely the opposite of what is going to happen to-day.