going


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going

[′gō·iŋ]
(civil engineering)
On a staircase, the distance between the faces of two successive risers.

going

(Brit.) 1. The horizontal distance between two consecutive risers of a step. 2. Of a stair or flight, the horizontal distance between the first and last risers, i.e., the run.
References in classic literature ?
I am going to Sparta and to Pylos to see if I can hear anything about the return of my dear father.
When they had brought the things as he told them, Telemachus went on board, Minerva going before him and taking her seat in the stern of the vessel, while Telemachus sat beside her.
Seth was silent from utter astonishment: he knew nothing that could suggest to him a reason for Hetty's going away.
I can't tell thee where I'm going, and thee must say to her I'm gone on business as nobody is to know anything about.
We warn't going to borrow it when there warn't anybody around, the way pap would do, for that might set people after us.
Well, here she comes, and we said she was going to try and shave us; but she didn't seem to be sheering off a bit.
I guess I ought to stick out and make you go to college--but I know I can't, so I ain't going to try.
When it became noised abroad in Avonlea that Anne Shirley had given up the idea of going to college and intended to stay home and teach there was a good deal of discussion over it.
I was very well dressed, and had my gold watch as well as she; so I left the footman, and I puts myself in a rank with this young lady, having stayed till she had taken one double turn in the Mall, and was going forward again; by and by I saluted her by her name, with the title of Lady Betty.
I didn't know he was going to," cried Dora, blushing scarlet.
Isabella corroborated it: "My dearest Catherine, you cannot form an idea of the dirt; come, you must go; you cannot refuse going now.
And people would pass the house, going off in wagonettes and coaches as jolly and merry as could be, the sun shining out, and not a cloud to be seen.