gold, frankincense, and myrrh

gold, frankincense, and myrrh

given to the infant Jesus by the three Wise Men. [N.T.: Matthew 2:1–11]
References in periodicals archive ?
Then they opened their treasures and offered him gifts of gold, frankincense, and myrrh. And having been warned in a dream not to return to Herod, they departed for their country by another way.
The passage does specify the three gifts offered to the Christ child, however: "gold, frankincense, and myrrh." The expectation that no one would have come empty-handed probably determined the traditional count.
Then they opened their treasure chests and gave him gifts of gold, frankincense, and myrrh.
Two millennia on and while we know the story of the nativity and the three wise men bringing gifts of gold, frankincense, and myrrh, it appears we're a bit lacking on the knowledge side about what two of these gifts were (gold getting a tick mark every time of course).
Because the Authorized Version depended so heavily on Tyndale's work (though without acknowledgment), the voice is deeply familiar, as in Matthew 2 when "wise men" bring gifts of "gold, frankincense, and myrrh" (22-23), or in Hebrews 12, "Our God is a consuming fire" (359).
Though they're not gold, frankincense, and myrrh, these pearls of great price are worthy of being given to your loved ones this holiday season:
The Magi bring more than gold, frankincense, and myrrh. They bring our awe and homage to the little king on the throne of straw.
The Wise Men from the East, the legend goes, followed a star to bring their gifts of gold, frankincense, and myrrh.
What can be more absurd than that in front of the feeding trough three kings in fine raiment kneel, outstretched arms offering luxurious and expensive gifts of gold, frankincense, and myrrh to the refugee-child inside?
Because three gifts are mentioned - gold, frankincense, and myrrh - people assumed there were three magi.