Chrysochloridae

(redirected from golden mole)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

Chrysochloridae

[¦kris·ə′klȯr·ə‚dē]
(paleontology)
The golden moles, a family of extinct lipotyphlan mammals in the order Insectivora.

Chrysochloridae

 

(golden moles), a family of mammals of the order Insectivora. In appearance and way of life the Chrysochloridae resemble moles, but they are closer to otter shrews and tenrecs. The body is cylindrical and covered with short red, yellow, green, or purple fur with an attractive metallic sheen. It measures from 75 to 235 mm long; the tail is rudimentary. The bare tip of the snout is cornified, which aids the animal in burrowing. The third toe of the forefoot is very large, with an enormous claw. There are five genera, comprising 15–20 species. The Chrysochlorids inhabit dry steppes, sandy deserts, forests, and cultivated fields of South Africa, leading an underground and burrowing way of life. They feed on soil insects and their larvae and on other invertebrates.

Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
African golden moles possess almost the exact same adaptation, which provides an evolutionary advantage for digging mammals.
Washington, Jan 25 ( ANI ): Scientists have revealed that golden moles are the first known iridescent mammals.
Iridescence - a lustrous rainbow-like play of colour caused by differential refraction of light waves - has just been detected in the fur of golden moles.
Another surprising finding of the study is that the golden moles are completely blind, so they cannot even see their gorgeous fur.
Hottentot golden moles (Amblysomus hottentotus) are a group of small, blind, highly specialised mammals commonly found in sub-Saharan Africa.
To investigate in more detail they examined the body measurements of male golden moles.