gondola car


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gondola car

[′gän·də·lə ‚kär]
(engineering)
A flat-bottomed railroad car which has no top, fixed sides, and often removable ends, in which steel, rock, or heavy bulk commodities are transported.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The inferno had engulfed the gondola car. Edward had no choice but to abandon the rescue.
Moderator Greg Dixon of Baker Iron & Metal Co., Lexington, Ky., expressed concern that the average annual age of gondola cars (25 years) could work against any efforts to reinforce the fleet.
Adding to the overall trend, the rail industry has had some difficult issues throughout the past several months-from shortages of gondola cars to sharply higher shipping rates--which are allowing many of the trucking companies to extend their business into areas that typically were heavily focused on rail movement.
Brian Maher, senior business director, ferrous metals for Union Pacific, says that as the steel industry starts to improve, the company is starting to see a pickup in shipments and demand for gondola cars. UP is the largest railroad system in North America.
Gondola cars of model 12-9941 are made by the project of Qiqihar railway company (PRC) with the use of trucks of model ZK1.
A power utility company experienced a series of isolated top chord buckles in their coal gondola cars. Buckled top chords are shown in Figure 4.
However, the picture on tariffs is different, as prices for gondola cars have broadly stabilised at 10-15% below the average 2012 price.
MMK-Trans owns 3558 railcars (mostly gondola cars).
Its 34 gondola cars will be able to carry up to 2,500 people per hour, and two million passengers a year are expected.
It also leases 70 gondola cars, open-top cars for carrying loose bulk material, such as scrap metal, Mr.
Rescuers climbed a snow-covered slope at the Ontake ski resort in the state of Nagano, forced open the doors of 17 of the gondola cars and lowered the passengers by rope one at a time to the ground about 20 yards below, said police spokeswoman Akiko Fuseya.
In addressing some trends in the rail transportation side, Wilmot noted a move toward using larger gondola cars, 66-foot or 65-foot gondolas, as compared to 52-foot gondola cars.