gong

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gong,

percussion instrument consisting of a disk, usually with upturned edges, 3 ft (91 cm) or more in diameter in the modern orchestra, often made of bronze, and struck with a felt- or leather-covered mallet or drumstick. Of ancient origin—representations of the gong date back to the 6th cent. A.D.—it has also been called the tam-tam. First used in Western music in the funeral march of Gossec's Mirabeau (1791), the gong has since been a regular member of the European-type orchestra, but it is used sparingly. It is commonly used in East Asian music and in the gamelan music of Bali and Java.
The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2013, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. www.cc.columbia.edu/cu/cup/

GONG

Abbrev. for Global Oscillations Network Group.
Collins Dictionary of Astronomy © Market House Books Ltd, 2006
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Gong

 

a percussion instrument much in use by the people of Southeast Asia; a convex bronze disk with its edges curved outward.

The gong produces a melodious resounding tone when struck with a special hammer. It is used as a signaling instrument, to accompany dances and perfomances at puppet theaters, and in gamelan orchestras. The tam-tam, a variation of the gong, is used in operatic and symphonic orchestras.

R. B. GALAISKAIA

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

gong

1. a percussion instrument of indefinite pitch, consisting of a metal platelike disc struck with a soft-headed drumstick
2. a rimmed metal disc, hollow metal hemisphere, or metal strip, tube, or wire that produces a note when struck. It may be used to give alarm signals when operated electromagnetically
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
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