gonococcus


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gonococcus

[‚gän·ō′käk·əs]
(microbiology)
References in periodicals archive ?
The group of antibiotics called fluoroquinolones were used frequently for gonorrhea until a few years ago but are no longer recommended because gonococcus strains resistant to these drugs have spread worldwide and now are common in the United States.
It is clear that a new class of therapeutic agent active against the gonococcus is urgently needed but there are no obvious candidates at present.
This is because most cases of gonorrhoea and chlamydia are asymptomatic in MSM and the rate of cephalosporin-resistant gonococcus is higher than in heterosexual men and women.
Endocervical and urethral smear for gonococcus (Gram stain), and endocervical culture for gonococcus were negative in all pregnant women.
The gonococcus does this through its ability to undergo continual genomic mutation and internal recombination, even in the absence of antibiotic use or misuse.
Gonorrhea is diagnosed by identifying the gonococcus at common sites of infection (the cervix in women and the urethra in men), and sometimes the rectum and throat, depending on sexual practices that may expose these sites.
Cases were defined as men having urethral discharge on examination and urethral inflammation documented by the presence of >5 polymorphonuclear cells/high power field with absence of any gonococcus on smear examination after Gram staining and absence of any growth of gonococcus on culture.
There is only a report of naturally occurring gonococci expressing a hybrid porB1a/porB1b (7) (PorBla and PorBlb gonococcus porins, as in meningococci, are encoded by 2 families of diverged alleles of the porB gene [8]).