good seamanship

good seamanship

[¦gu̇d ′sē·mən·ship]
(navigation)
Any precaution which may be required by the ordinary practice of seamen.
References in classic literature ?
The Bank fleet pass good seamanship in silence; but a bungler is jeered all along the line.
It's also worth recording the comments of the Controller of the Navy who wrote: "Kelly was got into harbour not only by the good seamanship of the officers and men, but also on account of the excellent workmanship which ensured the watertightness of the other compartments.
It's also worth recording the com-Turn to Page 22 From Page 21 ments of the Controller of the Navy who wrote: "Kelly was got into harbour not only by the good seamanship of the officers and men, but also on account of the excellent workmanship which ensured the watertightness of the other compartments.
This issue our Cruising focus includes Jenifer Wells' special report on the importance of good seamanship as taught (or refreshed) when undertaking the RYA--YA Yachtmaster course, our Cruising Log feature on the CYCA's biennial cruise early in the new year to Hobart and around Tasmania simply called "H15" (appealing to the non-racing types who wish to sail south), as well as our Charter feature from Queensland Yacht Charters on getting away from it all, whether or not you're an experienced skipper.
It was not merely a breach of regulations, but it was against all common sense and good seamanship.
It was not merely a breach of regulations but it was against all common sense and good seamanship.
In cases like that it is all about good seamanship and thankfully we showed that to get around safely.
We had to rely on some good seamanship to deal with a strong current from Friday night's rainstorm, which meant dodging logs and other debris on the race course, and there was a good cross wind throughout the day that added to the challenge," commented the NAVSUP WSS military team captain and coordinator, Cmdr.
A big part of good seamanship is knowing what to do and how to do it when the unexpected happens.
They worked with impressive self-discipline in critical moments, but also displayed surprising understanding for the beauty inherent in good seamanship.
Nimitz insisted that good seamanship required each captain to decide for himself when the conditions were so dangerous for his ship that he needed to break formation and ensure the safety of the ship even if it meant disobeying the commanding admiral's orders.
There are many reasons why new or highly experienced skippers may wish to learn or revisit the theory behind good seamanship.
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