goosefoot


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goosefoot,

common name for the genus Chenopodium, as well as for the goosefoot family, Chenopodiaceae, a family of widely distributed shrubs and herbs that includes the beetbeet,
biennial or annual root vegetable of the family Chenopodiaceae (goosefoot family). The beet (Beta vulgaris) has been cultivated since pre-Christian times. Among its numerous varieties are the red, or garden, beet, the sugar beet, Swiss chard, and several types of
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, spinachspinach,
annual plant (Spinacia oleracea) of the family Chenopodiaceae (goosefoot family), probably of Persian origin and known to have been introduced into Europe in the 15th cent.
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, and mangel-wurzel. Most species thrive in soils with a high mineral concentration and grow in such regions as the alkali plains of the SW United States and the pampas of Argentina. Aside from the vegetables of this family and quinoaquinoa
, tall annual herb (Chenopodium quinoa) of the family Chenopodiaceae (goosefoot family), whose seeds have provided a staple food for peoples of the higher Andes since pre-Columbian times.
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, most members are not commercially valuable.

Of the genus Chenopodium, the goosefoot itself, C. album, (also called lamb's-quarters or pigweed) is a native of W Asia that has become a widespread weed; quinoa, C. quinoa, a plant native to the Andes mountains, is cultivated for its edible seeds and leaves. Other plants in the family include the Russian thistle (Salsola tragus), a tumbleweedtumbleweed,
any of several plants, particularly abundant in prairie and steppe regions, that commonly break from their roots at maturity and, drying into a rounded tangle of light, stiff branches, roll before the wind, covering long distances and scattering seed as they go.
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 of arid regions in the W United States and Eurasia, and greasewood (Sarcobatus species), grazing shrubs of the alkali plains also used locally as fuel.

Goosefoot is classified in the divison MagnoliophytaMagnoliophyta
, division of the plant kingdom consisting of those organisms commonly called the flowering plants, or angiosperms. The angiosperms have leaves, stems, and roots, and vascular, or conducting, tissue (xylem and phloem).
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, class Magnoliopsida, order Caryophyllales, family Chenopodiaceae.

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goosefoot

Great source of food. A very wide family of plants found all over the world that taste like spinach, including quinoa, pigweed, Amaranth, lambsquarters.. Leaves taste like, and can be used to substitute domestic spinach in any recipe. One of the most nutritious delicious greens there is, even better than spinach. Used a long time ago by farmers to fatten up their livestock. The matt, light-green leaves resemble the shape of a goose foot and have a white, powdery underside. Stem tops are covered with tiny greenish yellow flowers that become seeds. The grain seeds are gluten free and can be used in soups, salads, stir fries, and can be used to replace wheat flour. There is no reason to go hungry when this amazing wild plant is around. Soak seeds in water for 8 hours. Seeds are ripe when they fall from the plant when shaken or rubbed. There are many different varieties of this amazing family, here are some... Lambsquarters C. album- both wide-leaf and narrow-leaf, Bluebushes(Australia), Strawberry Blite-C. capitatum, krouvida, ????ß?da (in Greece), Mexican Tea-C. ambrosiodides, Quelite(Mexico), California Goosefoot-C. californicum, Oak-leaved Goosefoot-C. glaucum, Upright Goosefoot C. urbicum, Maple Leaf Goosefoot-C. hybridum, C. simplex, Good King Henry-C. bonus-henricus , Many-seeded Goosefoot-C. polyspermum, Desert Goosefoot-C. pratericola. There is a variety in India called “Tree Spinach” C. giganteum with a magenta color in the center, that grows to 9 ft tall! (3m) and is totally edible. The Strawberry blite variety looks like it has what appears to be berries, but are actually tightly crinkled red flowers that taste like spinach. Some people may be allergic to Goosefoot pollen. Has oxalates, so people with kidney stones, rheumatism or arthritis should be cautious. TOXIC LOOKALIKE- Hairy Nightshade- is hairy (Lambsquarter is not) Doesn't have white powdery coating like lambs quarter. Hairy nightshade flowers are the biggest distinguishing factor- they are white and much bigger, as opposed to tiny greenish lambsquarters flowers. Another similar plant, the NettleLeaf Goosefoot (Chenopodium murale) , is considered by some to be toxic because of its high levels of oxalates, but other people are just fine with it, depending how healthy you are (no kidney problems or stones). This plant has somewhat shinier leaves, a reddish stem and it smells bad.
References in periodicals archive ?
Suaeda californica, or California sea-blite, is a rare perennial subshrub in the goosefoot family.
In food preparation, edible seeds such as those of a widely used food, goosefoot (Chenopodium), were usually parched or roasted over a fire to keep them from sprouting during storage.
Lignum on the western half of the floodplain area probably extended further along the floodplain channels in conjunction with other species such as Nitre Goosefoot.
Thus, rather the resemblances between the appearance of the leaves and the claws of birds seem to have led to the English designations bird's foot (Ornithopus), crowfoot (Ranunculus) and goosefoot (Chenopodium).
An inter-row hoe with goosefoot shares mounted on a tool carrier with a combined in-row fertilizer spreader was used (BARTSCHI-FOBRO AG, Huswil, Switzerland).
Other notable shifts in species composition in PG included the disappearance of goosefoot species and an increase in trailing fleabane.
Family Name (Latin and Common): Chenopodiaceae, the Goosefoot family
The number of angiosperm families represented in the desert is limited, but some--such as the goosefoot family, Chenopodiaceae--are represented by very many species.
Over the past twenty years, though, a new picture of Indian agricultural history has emerged, slowly at first; but now a torrent of studies provide convincing proof that ancient farming involving goosefoot, marshelder, maygrass, little barley, knotweed, and other seemingly unlikely plants.
coontail Chara stonewort Chenopodiineae goosefoot super-order Chenopodium goosefoot Chenopodium berlandieri Moq.
The complex of indigenous domesticates includes a variety of nutritious seed plants such as pigweed (Amaranthus), lamb's quarter or goosefoot (Chenopodium), knotweed or smartweed (Polygonum), marshelder (Iva), ragweed (Ambrosia trifida L.