goshawk


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Related to goshawk: Coopers Hawk, peregrine falcon

goshawk:

see hawkhawk,
name generally applied to the smaller members of the Accipitridae, a heterogeneous family of diurnal birds of prey, such as the eagle, the kite, and the Old World vulture.
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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Goshawk

 

(Accipiter gentilis), a bird of prey of the family Accipitridae. The goshawk ranges from 52 to 70 cm in length and from 0.55 to 1.8 kg in weight. The females are larger than the males. The short broad wings and long tail enable the goshawk to dash with extreme agility through thick forests in pursuit of its prey. The back is blue-gray, and the underparts are barred; in young birds, the underparts are streaked.

The goshawk is distributed primarily in the forest zone of Europe, Asia, and North America and in the mountains of northwestern Africa. It is nonmigratory or weakly migratory. The preferred habitat is forests, where it nests in trees. A clutch contains three or four eggs, which for the most part are incubated by the female; the incubation period is about 35 days. The diet consists of birds and mammals to the size of a hare. On game farms, the goshawk can at times be destructive; in all areas, however, it is greatly reduced in numbers, so that the harm it causes is of small consequence. The goshawk is sometimes used in falconry.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

goshawk

a large hawk, Accipiter gentilis, of Europe, Asia, and North America, having a bluish-grey back and wings and paler underparts: used in falconry
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
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"To a goshawk there's nothing more inviting than a barn owl moving majestically over open fields," he explained.
In this study, the complete genome sequences of WNV strains derived from a 6-week-old goose, which died in 2003 during an outbreak of encephalitis in a Hungarian goose flock (strain goose-Hungary/03), and from a goshawk, which also died from encephalitis in the same region 1 year later (strain goshawk-Hungary/04), were determined, aligned, and phylogenetically analyzed.
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It is hard to monitor the movements of individual birds because of the elusive nature of the goshawk and its size which makes handling difficult.
The young goshawk - which can dive at a top speed of 200mph - was rescued by bird of prey expert Ade Williams, who lives near Llantrisant.
* CAUGHT ON CAMERA: Steven Dobrowski has a superb picture of a goshawk preparing to dive on two helpless victims while the victim is already in an owl's mouth in Phil Hack's What Mouse?
PC Steve Robinson, of Guisborough Neighbourhood Policing Team, said they were investigating allegations the man was keeping a rare unregistered goshawk and a protected barn owl.
A BIRD breeder has received a jail sentence after being found in possession of a rare goshawk.
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