Gossip

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Gossip

See also Slander.
Gourmandism (See EPICUREANISM, GLUTTONY.)
Graciousness (See COURTESY, HOSPITALITY.)
assembly of women
symbolizes gossip in dream context. [Dream Lore: Jobes, 143]
Blondie and Tootsie
two characters continually gossiping from morning to night. [Comics: “Blondie” in Horn, 118]
Duchess of Berwick
rumor-jabbering woman upsets Lady Windermere. [Br. Lit.: Lady Windermere’s Fan, Magill I, 488–490]
Norris, Mrs.
Fanny’s aunt, the universal type of busybody. [Br. Lit.: Mansfield Park, Magill I, 562–564]
Peyton Place
New Hampshire town where everyone knows everyone else’s business. [Am. Lit.: Peyton Place, Payton, 523]
Sneerwell, Lady
leader of a group that creates and spreads malicious gossip. [Br. Drama: Sheridan The School for Scandal]
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
"Nobody is perfect and we shouldn't judge people without a reason; people must stop gossiping at others and start looking at themselves."
On the other hand, some people find themselves gossiping to serve their one interest at the expense of others.
Like all studies has its limitations, especially this study used a small sample size and non-probability snowball technique which may have produced some of the hypothesis were not significant, especially there is non-existing literature review about generations on rumors and gossip, nor rumors and gossip on engagement as well as sex differences gossiping in the workplace.
Lablanca declares that when managers want us to avoid gossiping when we go to work, 'they expect us to leave behind the emotional and social parts of who we are.
With the involvement of academics, algorithms and mathematical models, gossiping is fast becoming a hot topic in the intellectual circles too, which in turn helps it shedding the skin of negativity during the passage of its cultural transformation.
Sample items for each subscale are: (a) Information, "Listening to people's opinions of others helps me better judge aspects of my own life"; (b) Friendship, "Talking about the personal lives of other people makes me feel in touch with my social circle"; (c) Influence, "When someone does something inappropriate, I think others should know so the person will be less likely to do it again"; and (d) Entertainment, "My experience is that gossiping is just plain fun." Items are rated on a 5-point Likert-type scale ranging from disagree strongly (1) to agree strongly (5).
Without loss of generality, in (n, n + 1], we randomly choose node i and node j for gossiping. Define a Lyapunov function V(n) = [[summation].sup.N.sub.m=1] [x.sup.2.sub.m](n), and we have
A quarter of those polled said they felt guilty after gossiping about others.
Parsons is intriguing on the differences between the Tatler and the Spectator, with the former's gossiping about political news and seeming encouraging of political debate being transformed into the more aloof style of the latter in the context of concerns about the unstable political world during the trial of Dr Sacheverell.
We all feel cornered and frustrated at times and gossiping to someone is an easy way to release that tension.
Here's an excerpt on gossiping that demonstrates the tools provided to girls in this new book:
The preacher transforms the exemplum in technical ways to make it seem less distant and more immediate and thus more like gossip, and as a result, he borders on gossiping himself in the pulpit.