Gossip

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Gossip

See also Slander.
Gourmandism (See EPICUREANISM, GLUTTONY.)
Graciousness (See COURTESY, HOSPITALITY.)
assembly of women
symbolizes gossip in dream context. [Dream Lore: Jobes, 143]
Blondie and Tootsie
two characters continually gossiping from morning to night. [Comics: “Blondie” in Horn, 118]
Duchess of Berwick
rumor-jabbering woman upsets Lady Windermere. [Br. Lit.: Lady Windermere’s Fan, Magill I, 488–490]
Norris, Mrs.
Fanny’s aunt, the universal type of busybody. [Br. Lit.: Mansfield Park, Magill I, 562–564]
Peyton Place
New Hampshire town where everyone knows everyone else’s business. [Am. Lit.: Peyton Place, Payton, 523]
Sneerwell, Lady
leader of a group that creates and spreads malicious gossip. [Br. Drama: Sheridan The School for Scandal]
References in classic literature ?
Why, gossips, what is it but to laugh in the faces of our godly magistrates, and make a pride out of what they, worthy gentlemen, meant for a punishment?"
Gossip Tourangeau obeyed, and read this inscription engraved above his head: "Medicine is the daughter of dreams.--JAMBLIQUE."
He bent down to the ear of Gossip Tourangeau, and said to him, softly enough not to be heard by the archdeacon: "I warned you that he was mad.
"Well," said the curate, "that and the second, third, and fourth parts all stand in need of a little rhubarb to purge their excess of bile, and they must be cleared of all that stuff about the Castle of Fame and other greater affectations, to which end let them be allowed the over-seas term, and, according as they mend, so shall mercy or justice be meted out to them; and in the mean time, gossip, do you keep them in your house and let no one read them."
Hand it over, gossip, for in it I reckon I have found a treasury of enjoyment and a mine of recreation.
I don't want you to marry me simply because by so doing a stop is put to the beach gossip, nor do I want you to marry me out of some foolish romantic notion.
It was all very well to say that he was devoted to his profession, and that he had neither time nor inclination to pick up fragments of gossip at dinner-parties and balls.
Did you see her, Doctor?' By this time, Doctor Wybrow had remembered his patients, and had heard enough of the club gossip. He followed the example of Baron Rivar, and walked off.
As to gossip, you know, sending him away won't hinder gossip.
Several of the women stopped their gossip long enough to cast curious looks upon our friends, but immediately they would turn away with a laugh or a sneer and resume their chatter.
Avonlea gossip buzzed over the fact, which had leaked out, nobody knew how.
"And mere gossip," he thought contemptuously, "stands in my way!"