gouache


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

gouache

(gwäsh): see watercolor paintingwatercolor painting,
in its wider sense, refers to all pigments mixed with water rather than with oil and also to the paintings produced by this process; it includes fresco and tempera as well as aquarelle, the process now commonly meant by the generic term.
..... Click the link for more information.
.

Gouache

A method of painting using opaque pigments pulverized in water and mixed with gum.

Gouache

 

paints consisting of finely ground pigments mixed with a water-glue binder (gum arabic, wheat starch, dextrin, or a similar substance) and an admixture of white; also, a work of art painted with these colors.

Gouache is generally used for painting on paper, cardboard, plywood, canvas, silk, or bone. It came into use as a variety of watercolor (in combination with which it is often used), when artists added white paint to watercolor paints to achieve an opaque layer of paint. Gouache was widely used as early as the Middle Ages by artists of many European and Asian countries, mainly in book miniatures. During the Renaissance it was also used in sketches, cartoons, and the tinting of drawings, and later in portrait miniatures. In the 18th and early 19th century, some artists used gouache to paint miniatures (in Russia, F. P. Tolstoi). The beginning of factory production of special gouache paints in the mid-19th century helped to make gouache a technique apart from watercolor painting—distinguished from the latter by the denseness, lack of transparency, and opaqueness of its tones.

In Russia the gouache technique became highly developed in the late 19th and early 20th century in the work of V. A. Serov, A. Ia. Golovin. and S. V. Ivanov, who used it for large easel paintings, taking advantage of its opaqueness to achieve decorative effects. Today, gouache is used for posters, book and applied graphics, sketches of theater sets, and decorative designs.

REFERENCE

Kiplik, D. I. Tekhnika zhivopisi, 6th ed. Moscow-Leningrad. 1950.

A. S. ZAITSEV

gouache

1. A method of painting, using opaque pigments pulverized in water and mixed with gum.
2. A painting so made.
3. An opaque color used in the process.

gouache

1. a painting technique using opaque watercolour paint in which the pigments are bound with glue and the lighter tones contain white
2. the paint used in this technique
3. a painting done by this method
References in periodicals archive ?
Gouache added, ``Fiscal 1995 was a pivotal year for our company.
Dozens of smaller gouaches offered these and other elements in slightly tamer combinations.
In this exhibition, which opens on Wednesday, she uses a variety of media including charcoal, pencil, ink, watercolour, gouache, oil and lithograph.
All are constructed from combinations of paper, cardboard, vellum, glue, and tape intertwined with pencil drawing and painterly gouache passages in how-dare-she color assemblies of, among others, gray, red, salmon pink, purple, pumpkin, and tangerine.
A wide range of media is referenced: drawing materials, oil, watercolor, gouache, and pen and ink.
Its versatility is explored with close-ups of pigments thinned with water for use in traditional watercolor techniques, used with opaque white for gouache, or piled layer on layer with a palette knife for impasto effects.
Photo (1) David Hockney mixes shapes - and mediums - in 1989's "Geometric Waves," using ink, gouache, marker pen and crayon.
This ubiquity continued unabated through mid-October with Paula Cooper Gallery's presentation of the artist's gouache series "Horizontal Lines, Black on Color" (2005).
Arranged as tight sequential grids, the paintings for three new videos, Coke Girl, Woman on the Beach, and Memento Mickey (all 2005), and three older videos, Milk of Amnesia, 1992, Garden of Regrets, 1994, and Lost and Found, 2004, are less studies or raw material than miniature works in their own right, pages torn from a flip book of dizzying chromatic breadth that depict the same subject in various combinations of watercolor, gouache, crayon, colored pencil, and collage.
The fine mesh of young camphor leaves possesses the powdery texture of a gouache drawing, and the splash of the waterfall against a rock is depicted as a white gap with knife-blade glitter.
Her first show at Irvine Contemporary Art featured five ink, gouache, and graphite drawings and one somber print in which she ponders the possible consequences of a contemporary urban addiction to new technology.
At the CAMH (which co-organized the exhibition with New York's New Museum), Zittel's gouache drawings, dehydrated food, and living units will settle in one place for the first time on native soil.