gouache


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gouache

(gwäsh): see watercolor paintingwatercolor painting,
in its wider sense, refers to all pigments mixed with water rather than with oil and also to the paintings produced by this process; it includes fresco and tempera as well as aquarelle, the process now commonly meant by the generic term.
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The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2013, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. www.cc.columbia.edu/cu/cup/

Gouache

A method of painting using opaque pigments pulverized in water and mixed with gum.
Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture Copyright © 2012, 2002, 1998 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Gouache

 

paints consisting of finely ground pigments mixed with a water-glue binder (gum arabic, wheat starch, dextrin, or a similar substance) and an admixture of white; also, a work of art painted with these colors.

Gouache is generally used for painting on paper, cardboard, plywood, canvas, silk, or bone. It came into use as a variety of watercolor (in combination with which it is often used), when artists added white paint to watercolor paints to achieve an opaque layer of paint. Gouache was widely used as early as the Middle Ages by artists of many European and Asian countries, mainly in book miniatures. During the Renaissance it was also used in sketches, cartoons, and the tinting of drawings, and later in portrait miniatures. In the 18th and early 19th century, some artists used gouache to paint miniatures (in Russia, F. P. Tolstoi). The beginning of factory production of special gouache paints in the mid-19th century helped to make gouache a technique apart from watercolor painting—distinguished from the latter by the denseness, lack of transparency, and opaqueness of its tones.

In Russia the gouache technique became highly developed in the late 19th and early 20th century in the work of V. A. Serov, A. Ia. Golovin. and S. V. Ivanov, who used it for large easel paintings, taking advantage of its opaqueness to achieve decorative effects. Today, gouache is used for posters, book and applied graphics, sketches of theater sets, and decorative designs.

REFERENCE

Kiplik, D. I. Tekhnika zhivopisi, 6th ed. Moscow-Leningrad. 1950.

A. S. ZAITSEV

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

gouache

1. A method of painting, using opaque pigments pulverized in water and mixed with gum.
2. A painting so made.
3. An opaque color used in the process.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

gouache

1. a painting technique using opaque watercolour paint in which the pigments are bound with glue and the lighter tones contain white
2. the paint used in this technique
3. a painting done by this method
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
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Until April 30, spend a minimum of P15,000 on a single-receipt transaction and receive an exclusive travel pouch from Gouache.
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The vivid gouache illustrations fairly leap off the page, enlivening the trusty hobbyhorse tales to a whole new level.
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