gouache

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gouache

(gwäsh): see watercolor paintingwatercolor painting,
in its wider sense, refers to all pigments mixed with water rather than with oil and also to the paintings produced by this process; it includes fresco and tempera as well as aquarelle, the process now commonly meant by the generic term.
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The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2013, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. www.cc.columbia.edu/cu/cup/

Gouache

A method of painting using opaque pigments pulverized in water and mixed with gum.
Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture Copyright © 2012, 2002, 1998 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Gouache

 

paints consisting of finely ground pigments mixed with a water-glue binder (gum arabic, wheat starch, dextrin, or a similar substance) and an admixture of white; also, a work of art painted with these colors.

Gouache is generally used for painting on paper, cardboard, plywood, canvas, silk, or bone. It came into use as a variety of watercolor (in combination with which it is often used), when artists added white paint to watercolor paints to achieve an opaque layer of paint. Gouache was widely used as early as the Middle Ages by artists of many European and Asian countries, mainly in book miniatures. During the Renaissance it was also used in sketches, cartoons, and the tinting of drawings, and later in portrait miniatures. In the 18th and early 19th century, some artists used gouache to paint miniatures (in Russia, F. P. Tolstoi). The beginning of factory production of special gouache paints in the mid-19th century helped to make gouache a technique apart from watercolor painting—distinguished from the latter by the denseness, lack of transparency, and opaqueness of its tones.

In Russia the gouache technique became highly developed in the late 19th and early 20th century in the work of V. A. Serov, A. Ia. Golovin. and S. V. Ivanov, who used it for large easel paintings, taking advantage of its opaqueness to achieve decorative effects. Today, gouache is used for posters, book and applied graphics, sketches of theater sets, and decorative designs.

REFERENCE

Kiplik, D. I. Tekhnika zhivopisi, 6th ed. Moscow-Leningrad. 1950.

A. S. ZAITSEV

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

gouache

1. A method of painting, using opaque pigments pulverized in water and mixed with gum.
2. A painting so made.
3. An opaque color used in the process.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

gouache

1. a painting technique using opaque watercolour paint in which the pigments are bound with glue and the lighter tones contain white
2. the paint used in this technique
3. a painting done by this method
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Caption: Hu Zi, Florence Neptune V, 2018, gouache on paper, 89 3/8 x 44".
Argues deployment of white gouache is a source of light completely
What: Paintings in watercolor, gouache, pastel and oil
Caption: Zoe Pettijohn Schade, Rainbow Tornado, 2008, gouache, silver leaf, and composite leaf on paper, 60 x 40".
Awkward Artefacts contains illustrations of all 52 gouaches and drawings from the 'Erotic Fantasies'.
Blair's gouaches show objects that are ordinary enough: doors and door handles, windows and windowpanes, light-filled hallways, cocktails in glasses, glass ashtrays.
Along with drawings in ink, conte crayon, watercolor, gouache, and charcoal, the exhibition included a number of prints--etchings, woodcuts, linocuts.
A Play with Music" is the title Salomon gave to nearly 800 gouaches she produced between 1940 and 1942.
The Museum Ludwig survey will feature roughly a dozen such works but also some 150 lesser-known pieces in which Baer developed and exceeded her earlier concerns: richly colored gouaches of provocative symmetries and patterns, small rectangular studies (with creased edges and notched corners that allowed her to figure out the workings of her wraparound compositions), watercolors that Baer used to imagine bold installations of paintings, and a nude from 1960 that anticipates the subtle figuration with which Baer left her signature austerity behind.