government


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government,

system of social control under which the right to make laws, and the right to enforce them, is vested in a particular group in society. There are many classifications of government. According to the classical formula, governments are distinguished by whether power is held by one man, a few, or a majority. Today, it is common to distinguish between types of government on the basis of institutional organization and the degree of control exercised over the society. Organizationally, governments may be classified into parliamentary or presidential systems, depending on the relationship between executive and legislature. Government may also be classified according to the distribution of power at different levels. It may be unitary—i.e., with the central government controlling local affairs—or it may be federated or confederated, according to the degree of autonomy of local government. The basic law determining the form of government is called the constitutionconstitution,
fundamental principles of government in a nation, either implied in its laws, institutions, and customs, or embodied in one fundamental document or in several.
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 and may be written, as in the United States, or largely unwritten, as in Great Britain. Modern governments perform many functions besides the traditional ones of providing internal and external security, order, and justice; most are involved in providing welfare services, regulating the economy, and establishing educational systems. The extreme case of governmental regulation of every aspect of people's lives is totalitarianismtotalitarianism
, a modern autocratic government in which the state involves itself in all facets of society, including the daily life of its citizens. A totalitarian government seeks to control not only all economic and political matters but the attitudes, values, and beliefs
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.

Bibliography

See R. M. MacIver, The Web of Government (rev. ed. 1965); S. H. Beer, Patterns of Government (3d ed. 1973); G. A. Almond and G. B. Powell, Comparative Politics: A Developmental Approach (1966); S. E. Finer, Comparative Government (1970).

The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2013, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. www.cc.columbia.edu/cu/cup/
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Government

 

the highest executive body of a state. Sometimes called the council of ministers or cabinet of ministers, governments are headed by a prime minister, a chancellor, or by the chairman of the council of ministers or cabinet of ministers. In some countries the government is headed by the head of state—in the USA, for example, by the president. Such members of the government as ministers, secretaries, and secretaries of state direct state administrative departments. Governments may be composed of one or of several parties. Federal states have a central or federal government as well as governments of the political units, for example, states or provinces, that form the federation.

In capitalist countries governments are formed by a parliament or are appointed by the monarch or president. In the Federal Republic of Germany, Ireland, and Japan the head of state appoints as premier or chancellor a person elected by parliament. In many countries the government according to law is responsible to parliament, but in reality all the power is generally wielded by the government and its head; this system of government by ministers has replaced parliamentarism. In capitalist countries, the government’s delegated legislative power is of great importance. Bourgeois governments are continually under the influence of large capitalist conglomerates, which determine the government’s composition and policies. Thus, the government becomes in actuality the political instrument of a small group of leading monopolists, who utilize the government to control society.

In socialist states the government is formed by the highest body of the people’s representatives, to which it is responsible and accountable. The governments of the socialist countries are the highest executive and administrative bodies of state authority. Their formation, composition, and scope are determined by constitutions or by constitutional laws.


Government

 

in linguistics, a syntactic relationship between the parts of a sentence; the lexical and grammatical characteristics of one part (the governing part) determine the grammatical form of another part (the subordinate part). For example, a transitive verb requires an object in the accusative case without a preposition, as in “I see a friend.”

In the structure of a sentence, the relationship of government applies to the objects of nouns and is in contrast to the relationships of agreement and subordination. In verbal government the verb is the governing part, and in nominal government the verbal noun is the governing part.

In Russian, the subordinate part of a sentence governed by a transitive verb is in the accusative case without a preposition (direct object); the subordinate part of a sentence governed by an intransitive verb is in the genitive or another case (indirect object). There is a certain correlation between verbal and nominal government. When a verbal noun has been formed from a transitive verb, the accusative case of the direct object changes to the genitive case. For example, in the phrase vybirat’ knigu (“to choose a book”) the noun is in the accusative case, and in vybor knigi (“the choice of a book”) it is in the genitive case. If the verb is intransitive, the case of the indirect object does not change. For example, in both zhazhdat’ slavy (“to long for glory”) and zhazhda slavy (“a longing for glory”) the noun is in the genitive case. Government of an indirect object may occur without a preposition, as in bolet’ grippom (“to be ill with [by means of] influenza”), or with a preposition, as in bolet’ za komandu (“to be a fan of the team”).

Government may also be strong or loose. In strong government the choice of the preposition and of the case of the governed part is strictly restricted. For example, zaviset’ ot (“to depend on”) must be followed by the genitive case. Loose government permits a freer choice of combinations of the governing part with different forms of the subordinate part. For example, govorit’s (“to speak with”) is followed by a noun in the instrumental case, and govorit’ o (“to speak about”) is followed by a noun in the prepositional case.

V. A. VINOGRADOV

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

government

1. the exercise of political authority over the actions, affairs, etc., of a political unit, people, etc., as well as the performance of certain functions for this unit or body; the action of governing; political rule and administration
2. the system or form by which a community, etc., is ruled
3. the executive policy-making body of a political unit, community, etc.; ministry or administration
4. 
a. the state and its administration
b. (as modifier): a government agency
www.lib.umich.edu/govdocs/index.html
www.library.northwestern.edu/govpub/resource/internat
www.wto.org/english/res_e/statis_e/natl_e.pdf
www.politicalresources.net
www.lib.berkeley.edu/doemoff/gov_intlgen.html
www.psa.ac.uk/www/archives.htm
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Effective, sustained government communication campaigns should start with well-designed objectives largely aimed at gaining the active cooperation of citizens in action programs (for example, soil conservation); compliance in regulatory programs (for example, public health issues such as immunization of small children); and voter support for the incumbent administration's policies (for example, a free market economy).
Some of the commenters openly bash the government. Last year a reader angry about government censorship used Champress to urge the country's rulers to "Loosen your hold on peoples' thoughts," adding, "When are we going to talk about freedom and democracy and transparency?" More recently, the summer violence in Israel and Lebanon produced a flood of reader comments with a predictably anti-Israel slant--a position generally shared by Syrians whether or not they back Assad.
Yet, despite the leading language, fully 60 percent of all of those questioned also agreed that negotiations "will lead to government price controls on prescription drugs." That actually is remarkable considering the underlying assumptions of the questioning.
The federal government appears not especially interested in anything new or different.
It's not that unified governments love to purchase bombers, but, rather, that they tend to draw us into war.
A government should have a good understanding of the post-employment benefits other than pensions that it is offering and should begin educating public officials to ensure a timely and accurate response to the effect of the standard on its operations and plans.
The part of government that s been swelling nonstop is the part that, generally speaking, deals with violence or, to put it in more conventional terms, "national security." Since 9/11, the military has ballooned.
The church sued the government arguing that its rights under the 1993 federal religious freedom law were threatened by the government's actions to bar its use of hoasca.
* The Spanish government's attempts to prevent a takeover of the Spanish electricity company Endesa by its German competitor Eon;
On the contrary, government deals have risen year after year.
Another Army official thought, "Industry has the expertise, and more knowledge than the government. The LSI can [acquire] better people faster than the government can.

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