graded


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graded

[′grād·əd]
(geology)
Brought to or established at grade.
References in periodicals archive ?
Immediately following the return of the graded exams, students completed the causal attribution survey.
Tumors are graded according to a three-tiered scoring system, which is based on an evaluation of several morphologic characteristics: the amount of intracystic component, the type of cell composition, the pattern of invasion, the presence or absence of necrosis, the mitotic count, and the degree of nuclear pleomorphism.
In language arts, no test was to be graded below "50," even one that was turned in blank.
In May 1888, Wilson, North Carolina, "educationally speaking," had reached "a crisis in her existence." "Our future in every department of progress," wrote Josephus Daniels, the editor of the local newspaper, the Wilson Advance, "depends to an alarming extent upon the manner in which we sustain the schools we already have and the efforts we make to establish other institutions of learning."(1) The Wilson graded schools, one for white children and one for black children, had closed in 1884, and the editor now hoped to persuade merchants and planters in and about Wilson to finance the white graded school privately, although not the school for black children.
Consequently, although students may believe their completed assignments are well done given the time available, they may be graded unfavorably by the teacher.
If it is merely to have twelve grades at the end of the term or that departmental policy requires that all work be graded, these will become ends in themselves, and the interpretation of the final assigned grade will become even more difficult.