gradualism

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gradualism

Geology the theory that explains major changes in rock strata, fossils, etc. in terms of gradual evolutionary processes rather than sudden violent catastrophes

gradualism

[′graj·ə·wə‚liz·əm]
(evolution)
A model of evolution in which change is slow, steady, and on the whole ameliorative, resulting in a gradual and continuous increase in biological diversity. Also known as phyletic gradualism.
References in periodicals archive ?
While AQAP has moved its forces from al-Mukalla, thanks to its gradualist approach, it still exercises control within the city and over the surrounding countryside.
In what seems to be another indication of the acceptance of a more gradualist approach to achieving its goals, AQAP is focused on making itself indispensable to many of the anti-Houthi forces fighting along the frontlines of Yemen's civil war.
The gradualists have called for economic integration before political integration, but the rapidest have called for political integration as a means to economic integration.
(9) Baregu, "Nyerere and African Unity: From Gradualist to an Adept Fast-tracker," The Citizen, April 14, 2010
(41) This further strengthened the gradualists. For example, Fernando Leniz, who became economics minister in October 1973, was a prominent businessman with close ties to the Edwards and Matte conglomerates.
Certainly, the AU and the proposed United States of Africa are regional integration projects, the notable regional powers in Africa: South-Africa and Nigeria (The third being Egypt) are gradualists in the African integration project.
Both, shock therapists and gradualists, admit now the need for macroeconomic stabilization -- differences in opinions here (5% or 15% annual inflation) do not seem to be crucial.
The party is not split by a feud between the fundamentalists and gradualists - it's being split due to the way people are treated by Crawford and Russell."
The SNP is said to be split into two factions - the "gradualists" who believe independence can be arrived at in a series of steps, and the "fundamentalists"who demand independence now.
Both Blackford and Macdonald are "fundies", fundamentalists who believe in flat-out independence-or-nothing, while the Salmond faction are "gradualists" with a softly-softly don't-scare-the-voters approach.
The move threatens to plunge the SNP into civil war, creating a fight for the "soul" of the party between Salmond's gradualists and the hardline independence-or-bust wing.
Broadly speaking, we may distinguish between "radical" and "gradualist" reform models, although the distinction is somewhat problematic.