graduate

(redirected from graduation)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Wikipedia.

graduate

1. 
a. a person who has been awarded a first degree from a university or college
b. (as modifier): a graduate profession
2. US and Canadian a student who has completed a course of studies at a high school and received a diploma
3. US a container, such as a flask, marked to indicate its capacity

graduate

[′graj·ə·wət]
(chemistry)
A cylindrical vessel that is calibrated in fluid ounces or milliliters or both; used to measure the volume of liquids.
References in periodicals archive ?
CEPI calculates graduation rates by tracking individual student enrollment records from the time they first enroll as ninth-graders.
During the seminar, Department for International Development (DFID) Chief Economist Stefan Dercon gave a talk on poverty graduation highlighting the pre-requisites for the selection of best poverty graduation model.
Read: (http://Graduation 2016: Tulane University Students Protest Hoda Kotb Because 'We Deserve Better') Graduation 2016: Tulane University Students Protest Hoda Kotb Because 'We Deserve Better'
The report surveyed states and school districts in Oregon that have made progress toward higher graduation rates in recent years, and offered recommendations for replicating those successes.
The graduation rates from every school district in one map.
Graduation day readies students for higher responsibilities as young professionals, in the case of college graduates, and for going to the next level, for elementary and high school graduates.
With additional flexibility now provided to school districts, we should expect graduation numbers to remain strong with all students better prepared for life after high school in college, the workplace or military," Michael Williams, Texas' education commissioner, said in an August statement, referring to a new law that restructured the state's high school curriculum requirements.
Project Graduation relies on the involvement and contributions of parent volunteers.
This paper examines the graduation rates of a small cohort of these students namely Hispanics and African Americans in Texas public universities from 2002 to 2011.
Cayetano also announced that as last year, the coming graduation ceremonies in all 34 public elementary and high schools can be seen via a live video online streaming through the city's pioneering e-Graduation program.
Breaking down these trends by race and ethnicity shows that while all groups saw improvements on average, the greatest gains were attributed to groups with historically low on-time graduation rates.
The report describes recent state actions aimed at ensuring all students graduate from high school college-and career-ready, and policy issues such as graduation rate calculations, accountability, and state data systems.