graft

(redirected from graft bed)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial.

graft,

in surgery: see transplantation, medicaltransplantation, medical,
surgical procedure by which a tissue or organ is removed and replaced by a corresponding part, usually from another part of the body or from another individual.
..... Click the link for more information.
.
The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2013, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. www.cc.columbia.edu/cu/cup/

graft

[graft]
(biology)
To unite to form a graft.
A piece of tissue transplanted from one individual to another or to a different place on the same individual.
An individual resulting from the grafting of parts.
(botany)
To unite a scion to an understock in such manner that the two grow together and continue development as a single plant without change in scion or stock.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

graft

To join a scion, shoot, or bud to the stock of another similar plant.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

graft

1. Horticulture
a. a piece of plant tissue (the scion), normally a stem, that is made to unite with an established plant (the stock), which supports and nourishes it
b. the plant resulting from the union of scion and stock
c. the point of union between the scion and the stock
2. Surgery a piece of tissue or an organ transplanted from a donor or from the patient's own body to an area of the body in need of the tissue
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Dana, "Relevance of the direct pathway of sensitization in corneal transplantation is dictated by the graft bed microenvironment," Journal of Immunology, vol.
Thus, a sufficiently large raw area was available to serve as the graft bed. The grafts buried under the flap received an early and adequate blood supply.
Ischemic strictures due to instrumentation or prolonged catheterization has shown less satisfactory results inspite the use of pedicled flaps, due to more extensive spongiofibrosis which could compromise the graft bed (Mundy, 1993).(11) Hunter Wessells and Jack W Mc Aninch have shown that graft length, graft bed location and patient age differed significantly between the success and failure groups.