grain drill


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grain drill:

see drilldrill,
tool used to create a hole, usually in some hard substance, by its rotary or hammering action. Many different tools make up the drill family. The awl is a pointed instrument used for piercing small holes.
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grain drill

[′grān ‚dril]
(agriculture)
A drill used to sow small grains or seeds.
References in periodicals archive ?
The first prototype 30' grain drill is built 1979 Company is relocated to Assaria, KS.
There may be less expensive herbicide programs and no-till grain drills that could be employed to produce no-till continuous wheat.
produces durable industrial grinders, grain processors, grass seeders, grain drill and many other agricultural and industrial products.
In 1903, Empire and several other grain drill manufacturers merged to form American Seeding Machine Co.
A contemporary catalog lists the firm's products as coal stoves, mowers, reapers, grain drills, hay rakes, seeders, corn planters, cultivators, platform scales and fence-making machines.
If you put four bags of seed in the grain drill, "plant" 10 acres, and find out the drill is still full because a drive chain broke, consider yourself lucky.
My equipment, including two tractors, grain drill, combine, hammermill and winnower all together cost less than a good used pickup truck.
The company was created through the merger of seven local grain drill manufacturers: P.
If you have never driven a tractor, never plowed, and never calibrated a grain drill or corn planter, don't expect to harvest as much as the farmer who's been doing all that for 50 years.
The museum also supplied a McCormick-Deering 12-hole, 10-foot grain drill and a Peacock grain drill developed in the 1920s by Charles Peacock, Arriba, Colo.
Deardorff organized a factory in Springfield, Ohio, for the production of the Buckeye grain drill under the name of Thomas & Mast (thus the trade name "Buckeye" preceded the establishment of Ohio State University in 1870 and the subsequent OSU Buckeye mascot.
As might be expected, a demand from plow, harrow and grain drill manufacturers for steel coulters and discs soon developed.