grapnel

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Related to grapnels: kedge anchor

grapnel

1. a device with a multiple hook at one end and attached to a rope, which is thrown or hooked over a firm mooring to secure an object attached to the other end of the rope
2. a light anchor for small boats
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

grapnel

[′grap·nəl]
(design engineering)
An implement with claws used to recover a lost core, drill fittings, and junk from a borehole or for other grappling operations. Also known as grapple.
(naval architecture)
An anchor with four or five hooks used for dragging the bottom or for anchorage.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Viewed now through the shaken kaleidoscope of war and global economic shock - the grapnels on which Blair and the last Labour government are hung - the very idea of Britannia doesn't seem cool, not to almost half of Scots at any rate.
Equip the unit with bolt cutters (two per engineer squad), grapnels (three per engineer squad), a lane-marking kit, hand-emplaced explosives (10 per squad per lane), mine detectors, and probes.
The chief drawback to second-story techniques is that they are time-consuming, increase the time soldiers must spend in the open when buildings do not adjoin, and force us to use ladders or grapnels.
While recounting a canoeing accident caused by some faulty grapnels, Turnor maneuvers the committee into the thick of the adventure by concluding that "your Honours have been ill used" (Hearne and Turnor 268).
Thanks to state-of-the-art technology, huge budgets and ever-improving coordination, the foreign armada has thwarted many attacks and captured dozens of pirates, generally equipped with rudimentary skiffs, ladders and grapnels.
* Detection--using various kinds of equipment, such as probes, types of mine detectors, and grapnels.
Historical sources from approximately 3000 BCE onward make mention of an extraordinary list of lethal naval weaponry: bronze rams, grapnels, drags, arrows wrapped in burning sulfur, javelins, slings, darts, mangonels, catapults, and later "Greek fire," a napalm-like burning liquid shot from projectile tubes by the Byzantine navy to defend Constantinople from Arab ships.
In the operation which lasted for five hours, the Indian Navy found one AK 47 assault rifle, grapnels, ropes, fuel drums and ladders.