grasp

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grasp

[grasp]
(industrial engineering)
A basic element (therblig) in time-motion study; a useful element that accomplishes work.
References in periodicals archive ?
The impact can be devastating, since grasping is a fundamental aspect of our daily life.
Because Boris 2 is a robot with giant blue arms and huge grasping hands who made his public debut at the University of Birmingham.
Washington, July 19 ( ANI ): Researchers have created a new wrist-mounted robot that provides two extra fingers in order to enhance the grasping motion of the human hand.
Pressure sensors built into the fingertips of the glove detect when the user is grasping a tool or object.
Employing a grasping gesture as a prime, a number of authors found facilitation in object identification when the gesture was appropriate to handle the object (Borghi et al.
OKW has created the "BLOB" Series of contoured enclosures with housings that employ touch and feel to impart the functionality of the electronics while accommodating a wide range of users with different hand sizes and grasping volumes.
That means grasping and manipulating a variety of toots in ways that mimic at least some of the human hand's dexterity.
I use the flexible cystoscope and grasping forceps to overcome this problem.
The researchers from the University of Western Ontario sought to reveal how planning activity in the areas of the brain that are associated with reaching and grasping (the superior parietal cortex, middle intraparietal sulcus, and dorsal premotor cortex) indicated future movement.
A 16-mm tip is available for precise grasping of delicate soft tissue while a 25-mm tip available for grasping of large structures such as the stomach or colon.
Our ultimate goal is for patients with stroke to regain the ability to accomplish a variety of skilled tasks involving reaching and grasping using both the arm and hand.
Seven patients were assigned to a "motor therapy" technique consisting of computer-aided grasping and releasing, alternating with rest.