grasserie

grasserie

[′gras·ə·rē]
(invertebrate zoology)
A polyhedrosis disease of silkworms characterized by spotty yellowing of the skin and internal liquefaction. Also known as jaundice.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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We have two major pathogens that affect the Bombyx mori species caterpillar namely nuclear polyhedrosis virus and grasserie. The pathogen chokes the guts of the caterpillar therefore interfering with their feeding habits, says the farmer.
To date, there are very few phonetic and phonological studies of Mixean languages (Bickford 1984, 1985; Crawford 1963; Dieterman 2008; Hoogshagen 1959; Jany 2006, 2007) and only a handful of grammatical descriptions (De la Grasserie 1898; Hoogshagen 1997; Ruiz de Bravo Ahuja 1980; Schoenhals 1982; Van Haitsma 1976).
(45) The Breton magistrate, sociologist of law, and South American linguistics expert Raoul de la Grasserie (1839-1916) contradicted Roberty in maintaining that nations were now artificial, historically created races--a principal premise of his view that all truc nations deserved self-determination.
In the third discussion of this theme, at the Paris Societe de sociologie in April 1902, La Grasserie translated race as an "ethnic" quality anterior to society, necessary for "anthroposociological practice," a term used by Vacher de Lapouge.
For example, Raul Guerin de la Grasserie criticized the Peruvian Civil Code of 1852 for its systematic inexactitude and deficient classification, and Angel Osorio, President of Madrid's Colegio de Abogados and Real Academia de Jurisprudencia commented on reforms of Argentina's civil code.