Grate

(redirected from grates)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Idioms.
Related to grates: gratis, greats

grate

[grāt]
(engineering)
A support for burning solid fuels; usually made of closely spaced bars to hold the burning fuel, while allowing combustion air to rise up to the fuel from beneath, and ashes to fall away from the burning fuel.

Grate

A frame that consists of parallel metal bars, attached by cross bars at regular intervals; used as a grille or security device.

grate

A surface with suitable openings to support a fuel bed, such as coal, and permit passage of air through the burning fuel. Designed to permit removal of unburned residue, and may be horizontal or inclined, stationary or movable.
References in periodicals archive ?
Metso said it is planning the global launch of Poly-Met grates in late 2016.
Steel washer manufacturers discard metal sheets punched through with washer-size holes, and the sheets are perfect for creating the grates.
The council has already seen the theft of grates drop by three quarters where special forensic tagging has been used.
Eriez Magnetics Europe manufactures and utilises these Magnetic Tubes in powerful Grate configurations including the new Kwik Clean design.
They are stealing roadside grate covers - leaving holes which could lead to accidents.
The cast iron grates, which are oblong and approximately 10in by 4in, are believed to have been stolen by men in a flat-bed white van with no markings
While on first consideration, it may sound like multi-support grates would be better on wear, they are generally thinner than bridge grates and actually tend to wear away more quickly, Schwartz says.
Be sure the cooking grates are clean before you grill, notes Lisa Hanauer, an Oakland-based food writer and former chef restaurateur, who loves grilling vegetables and shares her corn-on-the cob grilling tricks in the September issue of Tauton's Fine Cooking magazine.
Thus, the iconographic narrative would seem to be this: the turbulent water pours down the steps and out of the Puritan domestic structure, through the grate at the base of the stairs, and metaphorically through the culvert pipe, into the underground where it is redeemed - an allegory of leaving home, leaving the Church, slipping through the cracks, and finding salvation in the counterculture of the underground, which is symbolized by the disorderly common beauty of the tide pool teeming with life.
The problem comes when private developers install metal grates around trees and then fail to expand them over time, causing the trees to eventually strangle in the grates' iron grip.
A light indicates that the unit is charging, and on a full charge the grater can grate more than 100 servings.
Iron tree guards and grates have been used in the United States since the late 1890s.