gravel bank

gravel bank

[′grav·əl ‚baŋk]
(geology)
A natural mound or exposed face of gravel, particularly such a place from which gravel is dug.
References in classic literature ?
I'd ha' been glad to behave to you like a mother's sister, if you'd come and live i' this country where there's some shelter and victual for man and beast, and folks don't live on the naked hills, like poultry a-scratching on a gravel bank.
But to prevent them from getting behind him, he was forced back, down past the pool and into the creek bed, till he brought up against a high gravel bank.
Mad River, though deserving its name from the impetuosity of its current, was free from rapids and cascades, and flowed on in a single channel between gravel banks, often fringed with cotton- wood and dwarf willows in abundance.
Simms, 42, from Gravel Bank, Bartley Green, was found guilty at Birmingham Crown Court of two counts of assisting an offender.
On Monday, Lane County Search and Rescue crews posted a sign on a gravel bank upriver from the area, warning people of the root ball as well as other debris in the water nearby.
I recall one sewin fisher on the River Teifi hooking a good sewin and T as he reversed in order to get the sewin onto the gravel bank, he tumbled on an old submerged piece of wood and broke his hip.
I'm standing on the tranquil South Dorset Ridgeway looking south across the 29-kilometre-long gravel bank of Chesil Beach--part of the Jurassic Coast World Heritage area--and the English Channel on a sunny autumn day, chatting with two members of the Dorset Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB) team.
He is the president of the New Zealand jet boat association and was driving the vessel when it is believed to have hit a gravel bank and flipped over.
Dr Paul Woods, 29, from Liverpool, who emigrated six months ago, was in a jet boat which hit a gravel bank and flipped over landing on him.
Paul's boat - driven by an experienced local man - flipped when it hit a gravel bank.
water, then climb the gravel bank, grabbing a stone-- pitted and flecked
Where present, the cohesive silt resists channel erosion and frequently forms ledges extending out into the channel below the gravel bank.