gravitational constant


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gravitational constant

Symbol: G . A universal constant that appears in Newton's law of gravitation and is the force of attraction between two bodies of unit mass separated by unit distance. It is equal to 6.672 × 10–11 N m2 kg–2. Predictions that G is decreasing very slightly with time (by less than one part in 1010) are not supported by experimental evidence.

gravitational constant

[‚grav·ə′tā·shən·əl ′kän·stənt]
(mechanics)
The constant of proportionality in Newton's law of gravitation, equal to the gravitational force between any two particles times the square of the distance between them, divided by the product of their masses. Also known as constant of gravitation.
References in periodicals archive ?
The initial gravitational constant is [G.sub.0] = 100 and [beta] = 20.
In order to link the spherical harmonic coefficients of the topographical potential with those of the geopotential in EGM08, it would be desirable to express the topographical potential using the same scale factor, namely the geocentric gravitational constant GM.
The parameter GM denotes the geocentric gravitational constant, lo is the mean angular velocity of the earth spin, and e = [[raiz cuadrada de[a.sup.2]-[b.sup.2]/a] stands for the first numerical eccentricity [Bornford, 1971] while a and b are the semi-axes of the ellipsoid.
If the gravitational constant were infinitesimally different one way or the other, the force of gravity would be much lesser or much greater, with bad consequences for the evolution of stars and planets.
However, measurements of the most universally recognized constant, G, the gravitational constant are known to vary leading today to a relative standard uncertainty CODATA value of G that is twelve times larger than measurements of the late 1980's.
g is the gravitational constant (32.2 ft/[sec.sup.2])
The only way to work out the problem was to discover what scientists call the gravitational constant - or The Big G.
Example [G.sub.1] will always denote the gravitational constant. The number is important.
Newton's equation for the gravitational attraction of one body to another (see 1687) contained symbols for the gravitational constant, the masses of the two bodies, the distance between them, and the acceleration of movement toward each other.
|Beta~ are physical constants (G = gravitational constant; e = electric charge; C = velocity of light; etc.);
where G, M, [m.sub.p], [k.sub.B], and r corresponds to the gravitational constant, the mass of the system, the particle mass, Boltzmann's constant, and the radius.