gravitational force


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Acronyms, Wikipedia.

gravitational force

See gravitation.

gravitational force

[‚grav·ə′tā·shən·əl ′fȯrs]
(mechanics)
The force on a particle due to its gravitational attraction to other particles.
References in periodicals archive ?
As shown in Table 1, while twice as many students (16%) gave the correct answer (the normal force of the book on the table) in this case, 68% of the class instead chose, "the gravitational force of the Earth on the book" (and another 10% chose, "the gravitational force of the book on the Earth").
Part III then considers the normativity of the gravitational force of federal law and stakes out some of its vices.
The particle movement velocity along the gravitational force direction is calculated in each zone.
The particles were assumed rigid, chemically inert and their movement was entirely in the direction of either centrifugal force or gravitational force. The interparticle forces and surface tensions were considered negligible, and wall effects were ignored assuming the much larger diameter of container when compared with the diameter of particle.
Like the gravitational force between Sun and Earth, information between particle A and particle B is also A-Temporal.
The strange orbits of some objects in the farthest reaches of our solar system, hypothesised by some astronomers to be shaped by an unknown ninth planet, can instead be explained by the combined gravitational force of small objects orbiting the Sun beyond Neptune, say researchers.
3 Calculation of the gravitational force in a sphere
There should be no gravitational force at the very center of Earth, Conover says, "but general relativity teaches us that clocks run slower due to the gravitational potential, not gravitational forces.
Today most dynamicists believe small errors in Neptune's observed position before 7977 created the illusion of the additional gravitational force.
They also estimate that the Milky Way's central black hole has a mass equivalent to four million Suns, large enough to produce a gravitational force strong enough to accelerate stars to hyper velocities.
The high tides, which are caused by the gravitational force of the moon when directly overhead, are predicted to affect the entire Welsh coastline, with parts of South Wales around Gower seeing the highest tide.