gravitational wave


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Related to gravitational wave: Gravitational Radiation, Gravity waves

gravitational wave

[‚grav·ə′tā·shən·əl ′wāv]
(relativity)
A propagating gravitational field predicted by general relativity, which is produced by some change in the distribution of matter; it travels at the speed of light, exerting forces on masses in its path. Also known as gravitational radiation.
References in periodicals archive ?
amp;nbsp;Those different scenarios produce different sets of gravitational waves.
The detection marks the first time that a cosmic event has been viewed in both gravitational waves and light.
The dawn of "multi-messenger astrophysics," which pairs telescope observations with gravitational wave detections to deepen scientists understanding of cosmic events, also promises answers to some of the most persistent questions about the universe.
By detecting these gravitational waves for the first time, we've not only directly verified a key prediction of Einstein's theory of general relativity in convincing and spectacular fashion, but we've opened up an entirely new window that will revolutionize our understanding of the cosmos.
Gravitational waves propagating though spacetime are similar to the ripples propagating though that puddle of water.
The first detection, in September, stunned scientists, due to the surprisingly large masses of the black holes and the whopping signals their gravitational waves left in the data.
In this article, we demystify the physics that goes behind detecting gravitational waves and the seminal work that goes behind it.
The noise at one is not correlated with the noise at the other -- unlike the signal from a passing gravitational wave, which would occur first at one location and then the other.
It has been a century since Einstein first predicted existence of the gravitational waves as one of the consequences of general relativity.
According to General Relativity Theory, gravitational waves are oscillations of spacetime or small distortions of spacetime geometry, or ripples of spacetime curvature which propagate in the time through space as waves.
A year after Einstein announced his theory of general relativity, he predicted that the speed of massive objects would distort space-time, sending out gravitational waves or tiny ripples reverberating in the cosmos that can both stretch and shrink.
The more strands we have in our web of pulsars, the more likely we are to sense when a gravitational wave passes by.