gravitational wave


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Acronyms, Wikipedia.
Related to gravitational wave: Gravitational Radiation, Gravity waves

gravitational wave

[‚grav·ə′tā·shən·əl ′wāv]
(relativity)
A propagating gravitational field predicted by general relativity, which is produced by some change in the distribution of matter; it travels at the speed of light, exerting forces on masses in its path. Also known as gravitational radiation.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
They are the most sensitive gravitational wave detectors ever built, and this is what they were built to do: there was a 'disturbance in the gravitational force', and the LIGO detectors have felt it!
The first gravitational wave event was a merger of two black holes, Lundquist said.
As a gravitational wave passes through the observatory, it causes extremely tiny distortions in the distance travelled by each laser beam.
Media hype also surrounded the first actual detection of gravitational waves, though this time with the opposite outcome: The detection of GW150914 panned out and revolutionized astronomy.
A long-standing goal of the LIGO project has been the development of multi-messenger astronomy--the near-simultaneous observation of cataclysmic events such as neutron star mergers or supernova explosions in both gravitational waves and light, providing details about the astrophysics of these phenomena that cannot be revealed through either alone.
The detection marks the first time that a cosmic event has been viewed in both gravitational waves and light.
One sun's worth of mass was converted into energy and carried away by the gravitational waves, LIGO scientists reported in San Diego during a meeting of the American Astronomical Society.
Gravitational wave observations hold the answers to many deep questions that trouble physics.
The noise at one is not correlated with the noise at the other -- unlike the signal from a passing gravitational wave, which would occur first at one location and then the other.
highlighted the importance of studying pulsars as another important avenue of gravitational wave astronomy.
The socalled "Great Metric Tensor" [13-14] is used to deduce a general gravitational wave equation; which is later applied to a sinusoidally varying mass for a homogeneous spherical distribution of mass.